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TODAY news for Thursday, February 12, 2007

Loma Linda University Behavioral Medicine Center news

CSI–Loma Linda: BMC uses crime scene theme to prepare for JCAHO

Therapists Lucy Brooks, LMFT (left), and Beverly Chilson, LMFT, are quizzed on staff education practices by Ron Morgan, EdD, director of research and education.
Therapists Lucy Brooks, LMFT (left), and Beverly Chilson, LMFT, are quizzed on staff education practices by Ron Morgan, EdD, director of research and education.
Preparation need not be boring: so reasoned the staff members at Loma Linda University Behavioral Medicine Center (BMC) when they planned an event to prepare employees for a re-accreditation survey.

The planning team created an event with a theme based on the television show “CSI: Crime Scene Investigation.”

A fake crime scene was even set up in one side of the room, complete with police tape and numbered tags indicating items of evidence.

But the twist on CSI is that in this case, the acronym stood for clinical systems improvement. Behavioral Medicine Center employees visited eight booths, each representing a different function area such as infection control or patient rights, and at each they were asked to investigate the right answers to questions posed on essential information.

“The whole idea is for employees to feel comfortable when surveyors show up,” says Scott Veltre, RN, nurse manager and co-chair of the event’s planning committee.

Every three years, BMC comes up for re-accreditation from the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO), and surveyors visit the campus. During the visits—which are now unannounced—Joint Commission surveyors can approach and question any employee. All must be ready.

According to Gina Palma, a licensed psychiatric technician, the CSI-style event was wonderful because of the coaching available.

“If you didn’t know a question or didn’t understand what they were telling you, they would explain it in detail,” she says.

The planning team tried to make this year’s event more user-friendly than in the past, according to co-chair Ron Morgan, EdD, director of research and education. Each employee was given a pocket-sized 28-page booklet with essential information to know, rather than the sheaves of papers handed out in years past.

In addition to the good information, the CSI theme added to the interest level of the event.

“Employees appreciated the creativity that went into it,” says Pam Dobbins, MFT, program manager of child intensive outpatient and adolescent partial-day treatment.

By Heather Reifsnyder

TODAY news for Thursday, February 12, 2007