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TODAY news for Thursday, February 26, 2007

Loma Linda University news

Sports massage therapist joins Drayson Center

New sports massage therapist Frank Anglin is ready and waiting to ease the pain of the �weekend warrior� with a short pre- and post-event massage, reducing the chance of injury and speeding up recovery time by two to three times.
New sports massage therapist Frank Anglin is ready and waiting to ease the pain of the “weekend warrior” with a short pre- and post-event massage, reducing the chance of injury and speeding up recovery time by two to three times.
Most professional athletes have a team of coaches and trainers who help them recover quickly and prepare for their next match, bout, or game.

And then there are the “weekend warriors” who play once or twice a week without the benefit of a coach or trainer. These are the individuals who limp into work the next day.

One of the secrets to reducing injuries and recovering more quickly is sports massage—both pre- and post-event.

As Frank Anglin, a recent medical massage graduate, will attest, a surprisingly short pre- and post-event massage can help the occasional—but highly competitive—sports enthusiast avoid injury and recover faster.

Catherine Ray and Carola Janiak run the Hands-on Medical Massage School, located in Yucaipa, California, where Mr. Anglin received his training. They also manage the team of medical massage therapists who work at Loma Linda University Drayson Center.

Mr. Anglin is joining the Drayson Center team. As a soft-tissue release certified therapist, his specialty is sports massage.

“The purpose of a sports massage,” Mr. Anglin explains, “is to warm up your muscles before a sports event, shortening their reaction time, and also reduce the time it takes to recover.”

That’s why professional athletes can turn around and play a match the next day—or even the same day.

“A post-event sports massage can speed up recovery time by two to three times,” says Mr. Anglin. “That allows even the weekend warrior to recover more quickly so that he or she is not as sore for work the next day.”

Sports massage incorporates rapid muscle palpations while a client stretches. It is quick and energetic in nature, in contrast to the calm and quiet deep tissue massage.

“You actually want to avoid a deep tissue massage right before you play,” Mr. Anglin suggests. “There’s a reason why your muscles feel fatigued after a deep tissue massage—they just received a workout.”

Pre-event sports massage only seeks to wake up and warm up the muscles. Post-event sports massage helps to relax the muscles and flush away bodily toxins that have built up during heavy activity.

“A 15-minute sports massage is ideal shortly before you play and within two hours of stopping,” Mr. Anglin details. “Delayed onset muscle soreness is one way your body shows the impact of inadequate warmup and stretching.”

Professional athletes, Mr. Anglin continues, rely on sports massage to increase their range of motion, strength, and flexibility while reducing recovery time.

To find out more about sports massage, or to schedule an appointment, call the Drayson Center wellness office at (909) 558-8690.

By Larry S. Kidder, MA

TODAY news for Thursday, February 26, 2007