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TODAY news for Thursday, February 11, 2008

School of Public Health news

Pfizer grant to SPH makes expert presentations available to public

Televisions around the world can be turned on to view the  �Dean�s Seminar: Designs for Health� on LLBN. In the episode pictured here, Ruben Gonzales of the Center for the Study of Social Policy talks about gang violence.
Televisions around the world can be turned on to view the  “Dean’s Seminar: Designs for Health” on LLBN. In the episode pictured here, Ruben Gonzales of the Center for the Study of Social Policy talks about gang violence.
A newly redesigned dean’s seminar series at Loma Linda University School of Public Health is now televised, offering the same educational opportunities to both students and a potential television audience of more than two million viewers.

In January, the School of Public Health began airing educational talks worldwide via the independent, nonprofit channel Loma Linda Broadcasting Network (LLBN). The series is called “Dean’s Seminar: Designs for Health.” Each program features an expert on a public health topic.

The series airs live from 12:00 noon to 1:00 p.m. on most Tuesdays during the 2008 winter, spring, and autumn academic quarters. The episodes begin the third Tuesday of each quarter and continue up through the week prior to exam week.

The series kicked off January 22 with a presentation on health disparities moderated by Susanne Montgomery, PhD, MPH, an LLU School of Public Health professor and director of the School’s Center for Health Research

“The list of health disparities is very long in this country, but one thing is the same throughout: that there are tremendous disparities between minority populations and the majority populations. Majority populations in the U.S. live longer, live better, have better access to health, and have better health care experiences,” she noted.

Dr. Montgomery, along with fellow local expert speakers Carlos Casiano, PhD, and Ed McField, discussed basic facts about health disparities and addressed ways to help eliminate them. Dr. Casiano is an associate professor in the School of Medicine and associate director of LLU’s Center for Health Disparities and Molecular Medicine. Mr. McField is an LLU student, as well as executive director of the Latino Health Collaborative.

The January 29 program focused on gang violence, with a presentation from Ruben Gonazles of the Center for the Study of Social Policy. On February 5, Juan Carlos Belliard, PhD, MPH, discussed the use of herbal remedies among the Latino community. Dr. Belliard is an assistant professor in the School of Public Health and associate director of diversity for LLU.

Made possible by a grant from the Pfizer Public Health and Government Group and courtesy of LLBN, “Designs for Health” is produced eight times each during the 2008 winter, spring, and autumn academic quarters.

The winter quarter sessions are devoted to health disparities, including such issues as oral health care for underprivileged children. The spring quarter sessions will center around the theme of specific public health issues—for example, addictions, environmentally linked asthma, and emerging considerations in HIV/AIDS care. Fall quarter will address the theme of essential public health services. To view the lineup of speakers, visit <www.designsforhealth.org>.

The presentations are recorded at the LLBN studios and teleconferenced live to a student audience on the LLU campus. Each session is also aired live on the Loma Linda Broadcasting Network. LLBN programming is also broadcast over the Internet at <www.llbn.tv>. For satellite information, visit <www.llbn.tv>.

Additionally, the programs are archived at <www.designsforhealth.org>.

“Designs for Health” represents a revitalized dean’s Seminar. The seminar is a non-credit academic graduation requirement for students. It offers a fresh examination of the science and art of contemporary public health practice, according to David Dyjack, DrPH, dean of the School of Public Health.

“The reformatted dean’s seminar employs innovation, technology, and partnerships to bring value to our local student body with the added benefit of delivering a weekly public health message to over two million households worldwide,” adds Dr. Dyjack.

By Heather Reifsnyder

TODAY news for Thursday, February 11, 2008