Loma Linda University

Prospective Students | Class Registration
Call Us At: 1-909-558-1000

News and Events > Today News > Today Story

TODAY news for Thursday, July 28, 2008

Loma Linda University Behavioral Medicine Center news

New 46,000-square-foot behavioral health outpatient pavilion will open in late 2009

Officials break ground for the Behavioral Health Institute Outpatient Pavilion in Redlands
Officials break ground for the Behavioral Health Institute Outpatient Pavilion in Redlands. Pictured (from left) are Edward Field, MBA, executive director of finance for the Behavioral Medicine Center; Jerry Wengerd, director of the Riverside County Department of Mental Health; Gary Atkins, MSW, deputy director of the San Bernardino County Department of Behavioral Health; Beverly Buckles, DSW, dean of the LLU School of Science and Technology; Patricia Gilbreath, mayor of Redlands; Mary Moline, PhD, DrPH, chair of the LLU department of counseling and family sciences; Jill Pollock, MS, RN, administrator of Behavioral Medicine Center; Adam Arechiga, PsyD, DrPH, assistant professor of psychology at LLU; Richard Hart, MD, DrPH, president and CEO of Loma Linda University Adventist Health Sciences Center; William Murdoch, MD, chair of the LLU department of psychiatry; Gerald Winslow, PhD, vice president for mission and culture, Loma Linda University Medical Center; and Roger Hadley, MD, dean of the LLU School of Medicine.
 A new 46,000-square-foot behavioral health outpatient pavilion at LLU will integrate clinical practice, academics, and research for the mutual benefit of both patients and students.

Ground was officially broken in early July for this new center, which will be called the Behavioral Health Institute Outpatient Pavilion. It is scheduled to open its doors in late 2009, situated on Iowa Street across from the Behavioral Medicine Center (BMC).

Many of the BMC’s outpatient programs will operate out of the institute, along with the following academic departments at LLU: counseling and family sciences, social work and social ecology, psychiatry, and psychology. Additionally, LLU’s marriage and family therapy clinic will move from its San Bernardino location to the institute, as well as the clinic that is now housed in the psychology department. The psychiatry department will also move its offices from the Dover Building to the new institute.

With all these related fields under one roof, the institute represents an improved clinical setting offering state-of-the-art care. Services will include therapy for families, couples, and individuals of any ages; intensive outpatient programs; psychological testing, and treatment by psychiatrists.

Because of the additional space, the BMC will be able to enlarge its busy outpatient services and help more people, says Jill Pollock, MS, RN, administrator of the BMC.

The new institute will also be beneficial for mental health students and residents.

“The institute will provide a collaborative interaction between the mental health specialty areas LLU offers, resulting in expanded student contact with the other mental health disciplines,” notes William Murdoch, MD, chair of the School of Medicine’s department of psychiatry.

Most of the academic departments moving to the institute are based in the School of Science and Technology (SST).

“The new facilities for the Behavioral Health Institute offer opportunities for students to observe true interdisciplinary practice,” says Beverly Buckles, DSW, dean of SST, “and learn how to be a valued member of an interdisciplinary team that works together on behalf of consumers.”

Ms. Pollock, who studied marriage and family therapy, notes that if she could have been trained in such an environment, she would definitely do it.

Another benefit of the new institute will be the opportunity for research collaboration between students, faculty, and BMC clinicians.

Research will be able to stretch across disciplinary boundaries, and this will make projects more competitive when applying for funding from sources such as the National Institute of Mental Health, notes Dr. Murdoch.

The groundbreaking ceremony took place July 9 and was attended by up to 200 people.

“It is amazing to see the outpouring of the commitment to mental health,” says Ms. Pollock. “There has been so much stigma surrounding mental health and chemical dependency. I believe the more visible we can be and the more help we can provide, the more people that will get help, and there will be less stigma.”

By Heather Reifsnyder

TODAY news for Thursday, July 28, 2008