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TODAY news for Thursday, July 20, 2006

School of Public Health news

New leadership sought for School of Public Health

MBA student Tekira Brinkley says her goodbyes to Dr. Kyle
MBA student Tekira Brinkley says her goodbyes to Dr. Kyle during his farewell luncheon, held in Nichol Hall on Dr. Kyle’s last day, July 5.
A University search committee is being formed to select a new dean for the School of Public Health. James Kyle II, MD, MDiv, left this month after serving as dean of the School of Public Health for the past two years.

LLU chancellor Richard Hart, MD, DrPH, expects to appoint an interim dean shortly. Meanwhile, many on campus say they will miss Dr. Kyle’s influence.

“Dr. Kyle embodied elegance, eloquence, and servant-leadership, reflecting a lifetime of dedication and commitment to God,” says David Dyjack, DrPH, associate dean for public health practice in Loma Linda University School of Public Health.

According to Dr. Kyle, it is his commitment to God that led to his decision to resign from the School.

“After prayer and fasting, I responded to God’s leading and decided it was time to move on to new responsibilities yet to be determined,” Dr. Kyle explains.

Patti Herring, PhD, RN, associate professor in the School of Public Health and co-investigator of the Adventist Health Study, says she is saddened by Dr. Kyle’s departure and wishes he was staying.

“I feel he made a difference in the lives of many people in the School of Public Heal
LLU chaplain Terry Swenson, MDiv (left), lays his hands on James Kyle II, MD, MDiv, and offers a dedicatory prayer for him, and for the School of Public Health, during the luncheon students held for Dr. Kyle
LLU chaplain Terry Swenson, MDiv (left), lays his hands on James Kyle II, MD, MDiv, and offers a dedicatory prayer for him, and for the School of Public Health, during the luncheon students held for Dr. Kyle on July 5, his last day as dean. Michael Conner, EdS, associate dean for student services in the School of Public Health, stands next to Dr. Kyle.
th and in the University in general, and many of us will miss him and his leadership,”

she says.

July 5 was Dr. Kyle’s last day as dean. On that day, both students and faculty honored him.

The School of Public Health student association organized a catered Italian luncheon in Nichol Hall. Four current and former students spoke about the impact Dr. Kyle made on the School.

Epidemiology student Daniel Cho says that Dr. Kyle is loved and will be sorely missed.

“I doubt it [will happen], but if the next dean of our School is half the dean that Dr. Kyle was, I think we’ll be lucky,” says Mr. Cho.

Dr. Kyle spoke to the gathered students, encouraging them to become professionals who serve to make a difference in the world. He also spoke about his confidence in God’s provision for the School of Public Health.

“I am convinced that this is God’s School,” he says.

 That evening, at the Carriage House in Redlands, the faculty hosted a Mexican-themed dinner and reception for Dr. Kyle.

There they presented him with a crystal globe on a mahogany base, bearing an inscription describing Dr. Kyle as “the man who changed our world.&rdq
Faculty reception
At the faculty reception in his honor, Dr. Kyle studies his gift from the School of Public Health family, a crystal globe on a mahogany base with an inscription that describes Dr. Kyle as “the man who changed our world.”
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Paul Simms, MPH, presented Dr. Kyle with a plaque of appreciation from California Black Health Network, which is a consortium of community agencies throughout California striving to improve the health status of people of African descent. Mr. Simms, an assistant professor in the School’s department of health administration and administrative director of the telehealth initiative, presented the plaque on behalf of his wife, Denise Adams-Simms, MPH, executive director of California Black Health Network.

Engaging the School of Public Health to enhance health for vulnerable and underserved populations is one of the activities Dr. Kyle says he fondly remembers from his tenure as dean. For example, the School has worked with both the Latino Health Collaborative and the African American Health Initiative to make positive changes.

Furthermore, under Dr. Kyle’s leadership, Loma Linda University was designated as the Southern California Regional Telehealth Network hub through a grant from the California Telemedicine and eHealth Center. The School of Public Health acts as the principal point of contact for the grant.

This telemedicine initiative positions Loma Linda University and Loma Linda University Medical Center to serve as a central communications hub to offer telehealth services—both specialty support for clinical diagnosis and treatment, as well as distance education—to rural and medically underserved areas of Southern California. Once established, the Loma Linda telehealth infrastructure will also be able to provide support to Adventist health care institutions worldwide.

Another important milestone under Dr. Kyle’s deanship was the establishment of a national advisory council for the School of Public Health. Made up of national leaders in health care, health delivery, biotechnology, and philanthropy, the council is intended to help drive the School of Public Health forward to national prominence.

Dr. Kyle also oversaw the reorganization of administrative order, protocols, and procedures within Loma Linda University School of Public Health.

Despite such accomplishments, Dr. Kyle says he’ll most miss interacting with students.

“They are the central focus of why you do education as a career,” he says.

By Heather Reifsnyder

TODAY news for Thursday, July 20, 2006