Loma Linda University

Prospective Students | Class Registration
Call Us At: 1-909-558-1000

News and Events > Today News > Today Story

TODAY news for Thursday, October 5, 2006

School of Medicine news

School of Medicine hosts ninth annual basic science research symposium

Carl F. Ware, PhD
Carl F. Ware, PhD, head and member of the division of molecular immunology at the La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, gives the keynote address at the symposium.
Loma Linda University School of Medicine hosted the 9th Annual Basic Science Research Symposium on Tuesday, September 12, in Wong Kerlee International Conference Center. The event offers an opportunity for the basic sciences at the School of Medicine and the researchers (including students, faculty, and staff) to come together and see what other research is going on at the institution.

“It is a learning and sharing time,” says Penny Duerksen-Hughes, PhD, associate professor of biochemistry and microbiology.

The symposium also saw the first official act of the new vice chancellor for academic affairs, Ron Carter, PhD, as he welcomed participants to the event.

“You make Loma Linda University a true university,” says Dr. Carter.

Roger Hadley, MD, dean of the School of Medicine, also welcomed the audience. “I have worked in a learning medical facility for 20 years and that has taught me to appreciate the basic science research and how that can help patients get back to the road to health,” says Dr. Hadley.

Six faculty presentations were given throughout the day, centered around the keynote Ryckman Lecture given by Carl F. Ware, PhD, head and member of the division of molecular immunology at the La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology (LIAI). The LIAI is a nonprofit private research institute dedicated to fundamental immunology and application to human diseases. Dr. Ware’s research is focused on the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) supe
Rachelle Mckenzie, a graduate student in the division of microbiology and molecular genetics, shares her research on studies in oxidative stress resistance of porphyromonas gingivalis W83.
Rachelle Mckenzie, a graduate student in the division of microbiology and molecular genetics, shares her research on studies in oxidative stress resistance of porphyromonas gingivalis W83.
rfamily of cytokines as immune regulators in autoimmunity, host defense, and cancer. Dr. Ware’s keynote address, “A Switch to Control Immunity: the LIGHT and DARC sides of a TNF Receptor,” delved into the communication networks used by T-cells mediated by the TNF superfamily. His work has revealed a new paradigm in signaling that controls both positive and inhibitory pathways governing T-cell activation, contributing to critical decisions that determine immunity and tolerance.

Dr. Ware obtained his PhD in 1979 in molecular biology and biochemistry at the University of California, Irvine, where his observations uncovered new members of the TNF superfamily of cytokines and their receptors. His postdoctoral training studies were conducted at the University of Texas Health Science Center and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Ware started his research laboratory and academic career at the University of California, Riverside, in the biomedical sciences program.

In 1996, he relocated his research program to the La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology. He is also an adjunct professor of biology at University of California, San Diego. Dr. Ware is a recipient of an NIH Merit Award and has chaired several NIH grant review panels in immunology and microbiology.

Dr. Ware serves on the board of directors of the Arthritis National Research Foundation and the scientific advisory board for the Sandler Program for Asthma Research, and he is president-elect of the International Cytokine Society and past president of the International TNF Congress.

After the scientific presentations, the conference was opened for a poster session where graduate students displayed the results of their summer research.

By Preston Clarke Smith
Kris Fritz, a graduate student in the department of biochemistry, talks about his research on the chaos in the calibrations of analogue-based free T4 assays.
Kris Fritz, a graduate student in the department of biochemistry, talks about his research on the chaos in the calibrations of analogue-based free T4 assays.
Teka Ann Lawrence, a graduate student in the Center for Molecular Biology and Gene Therapy,
Teka Ann Lawrence, a graduate student in the Center for Molecular Biology and Gene Therapy, explains her research on the regulation of UDP-glucose ceramide glucosyltransferase in human osteosarcoma cells.
Gabriel Linares, a graduate student working in the musculoskeletal disease center at the Jerry L. Pettis Memorial VA Medical Center,
Gabriel Linares, a graduate student working in the musculoskeletal disease center at the Jerry L. Pettis Memorial VA Medical Center, explains his research poster on evidence that GRX5, a growth hormone inducible gene, acts as a free radical scavenger in osteoblasts.
Lai Sum Leoh, a graduate student in the Center for Health Disparities Research
Lai Sum Leoh, a graduate student in the Center for Health Disparities Research, shares her research on the contribution of intron-derived C-terminal amino acid tail of LEDGF/P52 to its pro-apoptotic activity.

TODAY news for Thursday, October 5, 2006