Loma Linda University

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Clement Chan, MD
Assoc Clin Prof, Ophthalmology
School of Medicine
Publications    Book Review - Scholarly Journals--Published
  • Scientific Referee: Peer-reviewed journal, RETINA, (Alexander Brucker, M.D., Editor-in-Chief)

    • 2005 to 2007 (9 times)
    • 2008 to 2009 (16 times)
    • 2010  (7)
    • 2011 (3)
    • 2012 (7)
    • 2013 (3)
    ( 0/2005 - 0/2013 )
  • Scientific Referee: Peer-reviewed journal, Archives of Ophthalmology (Daniel Albert, M.D., Editor-in-Chief; Michael Ip, M.D., Associate Editor)

    • June 2011
    • June 2012
    • July 2012
    • Oct 2012
    • Dec 2012
    ( 6/2011 - 12/2012 )
  • Scientific Referee: Peer-reviewed journal, ACTA OPHTHALMOLOGICA (official journal of Nordic Ophthalmological societies, European Association for Vision and Eye Research), Professor Einar Stefánsson, Chief editor; Carsten Meyer M.D., associate editor

    • Aug 2008
    • Nov 2008
    • July 2010
    • April 2012
    • June 2012
    • July 2012 X 3
    ( 8/2008 - 7/2012 )
  • Scientifc Referee: Peer-reviewed journal, Retinal Cases and Brief Reports (Alexander Brucker, M.D., Editor-in-Chief)

    • Nov 2009
    • Sept 2010
    • Oct  2010
    • Feb 2011
    • Feb 2012
    ( 11/2009 - 2/2012 )
  • Scientific Referee: Peer-reviewed journal, Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery ( Mamalis, M.D., Editor-in-Chief)

    • Apr  2010
    • May 2010
    • April 2011
    • Dec 2011
    • Jan 2012
    ( 4/2010 - 1/2012 )
  • Scientific Referee: Peer-reviewed journal, Indian Journal of Ophthalmology (Barun K Nayak MD, Editor-in-Chief)

    • Jan 2009
    • Feb 2009
    • Apr 2009
    • Aug 2009
    • Apr 2010
    • Oct 2010
    • April 2011
    • Dec 2011
    • Jan 2012
    ( 1/2009 - 1/2012 )
  • Scientific Referee: Peer-reviewed journal, EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF OPHTHALMOLOGY (Rosario Brancato M.D., Editor-in-Chief)

    • 2008 to 2009 (7 times)
    • 2010 (5)
    • 2011 (2)
    • 2012 (1)
    ( 0/2008 - 0/2012 )
  • Scientific Referee: Peer-reviewed journal, EYE (Professor Ian Rennie, Professor A. J. Lotery Professor Harminder Dua Editors; Arun Singh M.D., Jose Pulido M.D., Young Kwon M.D., Parwez Hossain M.D., John Heckenlively M.D., Victor Chong, associate and section editors)

    • 2006 to 2008 (5 times)
    • 2009 (2 times)
    • 2010 (3)
    • 2012 (1)
    ( 0/2006 - 0/2012 )
  • Scientific Referee: Peer-reviewed journal, Journal of Ophthalmology (Hindawi  Publishing Corporation)

    ( 5/2011 )
  • Scientifi referee:  Peer-reviewed journal, Ophthalmology (Blue Journal), (Paul Lichter M.D., Andrew Schachat M.D., Editor-in-Chief)

    • Oct 1993
    • Mar 2008
    • Sep 2009
    • Dec 2009
    • April, May 2010
    ( 10/1993 - 5/2010 )
  • Scientific Referee: Peer-reviewed journal, British Journal of Ophthalmology 

    • Nov 2005
    • Jun 2008
    ( 11/2005 - 6/2008 )
  • Scientific Referee: Peer-reviewed journal, Canadian Journal of Ophthalmology (Graham Trope M.D., Editor-in-Chief)

    ( 7/2007 )
  • Scientific Referee:  Peer-reviewed journal, Journal of Ophthalmic Surgery and Lasers (Carmen A. Puliafito, M.D., Editor-in-Chief)

    ( 0/2002 )
  • Scientific Referee: Peer-reviewed journal, Journal of Refractive Surgery (George O. Waring III M.D., Editor-in-Chief)

    ( 0/2001 )
  Scholarly Journals--Published
  • Meyer CH, Chan CK, Clemens C, Holz FG. Estimation on the incidence and OCT risk factors for RPE tears after intravitreal anti-VEGF injections. Retina Physicians 2009; Nov. 1-3.

    ( 11/2009 )
  • Scott IU, Blodi BA, Ip MS, Van Veldhuisen PC, Oden NL, Chan CK, Gonzalez V, and the SCORE Study Investigator Group. SCORE Study Report 2: Interobserver agreement between investigator and reading center classification of retinal vein occlusion type. Ophthalmol 2009; 116:756-761.

    ( 0/2009 )
  • Ip MS, Scott IU, Van Veldhuisen PC, Oden NL, Blodi BA, Fisher M, Singerman LJ, Tolentino MS, Chan CK, Gonzalez VH and the SCORE Study Research Group. A randomized trial comparing the efficacy and safety of intravitreal triamcinolone with observation to treat vision loss associated with macular edema secondary to central retinal vein occlusion. The Standard Care versus COrticosteroid for REtinal Vein Occlusion (SCORE) Study Report 5. Arch Ophthalmol 2009;127:1101-1114.

    ( 0/2009 )
  • Scott IU, Ip MS, Van Veldhuisen PC, Oden NL, Blodi BA, Fisher M, Chan CK, Gonzalez V, Singerman LJ, Tolentino MS and the SCORE Study Research Group.  A randomized trial comparing the efficacy and safety of intravitreal triamcinolone with Standard Care to treat vision loss associated with macular edema secondary to branch retinal vein occlusion. The Standard Care versus COrticosteroid for REtinal Vein Occlusion (SCORE) Study Report 6.Arch Ophthalmol 2009;127:1115-1128.

    ( 0/2009 )
  • Writing Committee member of the Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network (Scott IU, Bressler NM, Bressler SB, Browning DJ, Chan CK, Danis RP, Davis MD, Kollman C, Qin H; Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network Study Group). Agreement between clinician and reading center gradings of diabetic retinopathy severity level at baseline in a phase 2 study of intravitreal bevacizumab for diabetic macular edema. Retina 2008; 28:36-40.

    ( 0/2008 )
  • Chan CK, Lin SG.  Subfoveal choroidal neovascularization associated with cytomegalovirus retinitis and acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Can J Ophthalmol 2008; 43:486-8.

    ( 0/2008 )
  • Chan CK, Lin SG. Nuthi ASD, Salib DM. Pneumatic retinopexy for the repair of retinal detachments: a comprehensive review (1986 to 2007). Surv Ophthalmol 2008; 53: 443-78.

    ( 0/2008 )
  • Chan CK. "Unilateral retinal granulomatous lesion (Section on Diagnostic and Therapeutic Challenges)." RETINA 27. (2007): 101-105. ( 1/2007 )
    Section on "Diagnostic and Therapeutic Challenges" Description of a case of unilateral granulomatous maculopathy due to Bartonella quintana
  • Chan CK, Lin SG. "Retinal pigment epithelial tear after ranibizumab therapy for subfoveal fibrovascular pigment epithelial detachment." EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF OPHTHALMOLOGY 17. (2007): 674-676. ( 1/2007 )
    PURPOSE: To describe the unusual complication of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) tear after intravitreal ranibizumab (Lucentis) for subfoveal fibrovascular pigment epithelial detachment (PED) and its effective management. METHODS: Chart review for case report of RPE tear after ranibizumab. RESULTS: An inferior RPE tear was documented by fluorescein angiography, fundus photography, and optical coherence tomography (OCT) 1 month after receiving repeat ranibizumab injection in the right eye of a patient with bilateral subfoveal fibrovascular PED. He had undergone multiple bevacizumab followed by ranibizumab injections for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in both eyes, starting 6 months previously. Subsequent antivascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapy improved vision of right eye from 20/200 to 20/40, despite RPE tear. CONCLUSIONS: RPE tear may form after anti-VEGF therapy, including ranibizumab injection. Further anti-VEGF therapy may preserve or improve vision. To the authors' knowledge, this is first case report of effective suppression of neovascular activity with bevacizumab after an RPE tear following ranibizumab therapy.
  • Chan CK, Meyer CH, Gross JG, Abraham P, Nuthi ASD, Kokame GT, Lin SG, Rauser ME, Kaiser PK . "Retinal pigment epithelial tears after intravitreal bevacizumab injection for neovascular age-related macular degeneration." RETINA 27. (2007): 541-551. ( 1/2007 )
    PURPOSE: To study retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) tears after off-label intravitreal bevacizumab (Avastin; Genentech, Inc., South San Francisco, CA) injection for neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Eyes with a vascularized pigment epithelial detachment (PED) that developed an RPE tear were compared with eyes with a vascularized PED but without an RPE tear. METHODS: Nine retina specialists across the United States and in Europe participated in this retrospective case series. All eyes that received intravitreal bevacizumab injection for choroidal neovascularization (CNV) over 12 months (October 2005 to September 2006) were included. Eyes without all three confirmed tests (fluorescein angiography, fundus photography, and optical coherence tomography) were excluded from analysis. Statistical analyses were performed on multiple characteristics of eyes with a vascularized PED that did and did not develop an RPE tear. RESULTS: Among 2,785 intravitreal bevacizumab injections for 1,064 eyes, RPE tears were found in 22 eyes in 22 patients (2.2%). A vascularized PED was present in 21 of 22 eyes that developed an RPE tear (17.1% of PED eyes; 15, 100% occult CNV; 6, predominantly occult CNV). Mean interval from bevacizumab injections to RPE tears was 37.3 days. Mean follow-up time was 124.9 days. Mean subfoveal PED size was larger for eyes with tears than for those without tears (13.97 mm vs 9.9 mm, respectively; P = 0.01; odds ratio, 1.09). There was substantially smaller mean ratio of CNV size to PED size for eyes with tears than for those without tears (27.9% vs 67.6%, respectively; P = 0.005). Mean pre-bevacizumab injection best-corrected Snellen visual acuity was 20/162, and mean post-RPE tear best-corrected visual acuity was 20/160 (P = 0.48). CONCLUSION: Large PED size is a predictor for RPE tears, and a small ratio of CNV size to PED size (
  • Chan CK, Lin SG. Nuthi ASD, Salib DM. "Pneumatic retinopexy for the repair of retinal detachments: A comprehensive review (1986 to 2006)." SURVEY OF OPHTHALMOLOGY . (2007): -. ( 1/2007 )
    Pneumatic retinopexy (PR) has become an important surgical technique in the modern era of retinal surgical management for RD. It is primarily indicated for uncomplicated RD with retinal breaks involving the superior 8 clock hours of the fundus, although more complex RD may be successfully managed with this technique on a selected basis. Qualified candidates must be willing to maintain a specific head posture for 5 or more days for optimal outcome with PR. Basic surgical steps of PR include retinopexy of retinal breaks with cryotherapy or laser, intraocular gas injection before or after retinopexy, and maintenance of proper head posture by the patient for the required time period after surgery. Phakic eyes fared better than nonphakic eyes for PR, with the single-operation successes of 71 to 84% for the former and 41% to 67% for the latter. Despite lower single-operation successes with PR in comparison to SBP, the multicenter PR trial and other published reports have shown that the final anatomical and visual outcomes are not disadvantaged by the initial PR. An extensive discussion of complications associated with PR is presented. In addition, a key feature of this review is a comprehensive update in the outcome of PR in published reports from 1986 to the present in chronological order not available in the current literature. This comprehensive summary shows updated average surgical outcomes for the 3929 eyes in the 20-year period to be similar to previous reports: single-operation successes (74.4%), final operation successes (96.0%), new retinal breaks (11.7%), and proliferative vitreoretinopathy (5.4%).
  • Chan CK. "Ocular manifestation of West Nile virus: a vanishing disease in North America?." CANADIAN JOURNAL OF OPHTHALMOLOGY 42. (2007): 195-198. ( 1/2007 )
    Please see report
  • Writing Committee member of the Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network: Scott I, Friedman S, Elman M, Chan CK, Browning D, Bressler N, Bressler S, Maturi R. "A Phase 2 Randomized, Multi-center Clinical Trial of Intravitreal Bevacizumab With and Without Focal Laser Photocoagulation for Diabetic Macular Edema." ARCHIVES OF OPHTHALMOLOGY . (2007): -. ( 1/2007 )
    Please see report
  • Writing Committee member of the Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network: Scott I, Browning D, Chan CK, Kollman C, Qin H, Bressler N, Bressler S, Davis DM, Danis R. "Agreement between clinician and reading center gradings of diabetic retinopathy severity level at baseline in a phase 2 study of intravitreal bevacizumab for diabetic macular edema." RETINA . (2007): -. ( 1/2007 )
    Please see report
  • Chan CK, Hawkins H, Lin SG. "Modified haptic externalizing technique for repositioning dislocated 1-piece acrylic posterior chamber implants." CANADIAN JOURNAL OF OPHTHALMOLOGY 42. (2007): 573-579. ( 1/2007 )
    BACKGROUND: To describe a novel vitreoretinal technique and the results of repositioning dislocated 1-piece acrylic posterior chamber intraocular lenses (PCIOL). METHODS: This retrospective study included 7 eyes of 7 patients (ages 41 to 82) who underwent repositioning surgery with vitreoretinal methodology for dislocated 1-piece acrylic PCIOL between 2003 and 2005. Repositioning surgery involved temporary haptic externalization via anterior sclerotomies and passing curved needles of 9-0 or 10-0 polypropylene sutures through soft distal knobs of haptics before reinternalization for sulcus fixation. RESULTS: All 7 repositioned PCIOL remained centered and stable after 12 to 28 months of follow-up (mean = 17.6 months). Mild anterior-posterior intraocular lens (IOL)-tilting developed in 1 eye, but the IOL remained centered and secured in the sulcus with good vision. One PCIOL was exchanged with an anterior chamber intraocular lens (ACIOL) 1 year after repositioning because of recurrent intraocular hemorrhage and cystoid macular edema. Preoperative best corrected Snellen visual acuity (BCVA) ranged from 20/40 to 5/200 (median = 20/70). Postoperative BCVA ranged from 20/20 to 20/200 (median = 20/40). Capsular defect was the cause of IOL dislocation for all cases. Four of 7 eyes (57.1%) had axial myopia. INTERPRETATION: This repositioning technique for dislocated all-acrylic PCIOL prevents suture slippage and allows secured sulcus fixation. Repositioned haptics should be sutured more than 1 mm from the limbus to avoid iris chafing.
  • Chan CK, Limstrom SA, Tarasewicz DG, Lin SG. "Ocular features of West Nile virus infection in North America. A study of 14 eyes." OPHTHALMOLOGY 113. (2006): 1539-1546. ( 1/2006 )
    PURPOSE: To present a case series of ocular findings of West Nile virus infection (WNVI) in North America. DESIGN: Retrospective, noncomparative, observational case series. PARTICIPANTS: All patients were referred to the authors for WNVI with ocular involvement between the years 2002 and 2005. METHODS: Chart review was performed on all participants. All participants underwent complete ophthalmic evaluation during each examination, including best-corrected Snellen visual acuity measurement, tonometry, slit-lamp biomicroscopy of the anterior and posterior segments, and dilated fundus examination with indirect ophthalmoscopy. Fundus photography and fluorescein angiography were also performed on all eyes. Relevant ocular findings associated with WNVI were recorded and tabulated. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The authors studied the characteristics, frequency, and locations of ocular lesions found in participants' eyes. RESULTS: There were 14 eyes (7 patients) with ocular West Nile virus lesions from 2002 to 2005. Average patient age was 58.4 years (range, 32-85 years). Ocular findings in descending order of frequency included multifocal chorioretinal target lesions in 12 eyes (85.7%), retinal hemorrhages in 7 eyes (50.0%), vitritis in 6 eyes (42.9%), chorioretinal linear streaks in 4 eyes (28.6%), perivascular sheathing and vasculitis in 4 eyes (28.6%), narrowed retinal vessels in 4 eyes (28.6%), disc edema in 4 eyes (28.6%), optic atrophy in 2 eyes (14.3%), vascular occlusion in 2 eyes (14.3%), and VIth nerve palsy in 1 eye (7.1%). Peripheral fundus lesions were found in all 14 eyes (100%), whereas posterior fundus lesions were found in 8 eyes (57.1%). Five patients (71.4%) were diabetic. Diabetic retinopathy was present in 7 eyes (70%). CONCLUSIONS: Multifocal choroiditis is the most common ocular manifestation associated with WNVI, with a typically benign clinical course. Less frequent ocular lesions, including optic neuritis and occlusive vasculitis, frequently induce persistent and likely permanent visual deficit. Diabetic patients and those older than 50 years of age are more vulnerable to the more severe features of WNVI, including more serious ocular lesions.
  • Arevalo JF, Mendoza AJ, Velez-Vazquez W, Rodriguez FJ, Rodriguez A, Rosales-Meneses JL, Yepez JB, Ramirez E, Dessouki A, Chan CK, Mittra RA, Ramsay RC,Garcia RA, Ruiz-Moreno JM. "Full-Thickness Macular Hole after LASIK for the Correction of Myopia." OPHTHALMOLOGY 112.7 (2005): 1207-1212. ( 7/2005 )
    PURPOSE: To describe 19 patients (20 eyes) who developed a macular hole (MH) after undergoing bilateral LASIK for the correction of myopia. DESIGN: Noncomparative, interventional, retrospective, multicenter case series. PARTICIPANTS: Nineteen patients (20 eyes) who developed an MH after bilateral LASIK for the correction of myopia at 10 institutions in Venezuela, Colombia, Puerto Rico, Spain, and the United States. METHODS: Chart review. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Macular hole development. RESULTS: The MH formed between 1 to 83 months after LASIK (mean, 12.1). In 60% of cases, the MH developed < or =6 months after LASIK, and in 30% of cases it developed > or =1 year after LASIK. Eighteen of 19 (94.7%) patients were female. Mean age was 46 years (range, 25-65). All eyes were myopic (range, -0.50 to -19.75 diopters [mean, -8.9]). Posterior vitreous detachment was not present before and was documented after LASIK in 55% of eyes. A vitrectomy closed the MH on the 14 eyes that underwent surgical management, with an improvement of final best-corrected visual acuity in 13 of 14 (92.8%) patients. Our 20 eyes with a full-thickness MH after LASIK reflect an incidence of approximately 0.02% (20/83938). CONCLUSION: An MH may infrequently develop after LASIK for the correction of myopia. Our study shows that vitreoretinal surgery can be successful in restoring vision for most myopic eyes with an MH after LASIK. Vitreoretinal interface changes may play a role in MH formation after LASIK for the correction of myopia.
  • Member of writing committee. "Pooled efficacy results from two multinational randomized controlled clinical trials of a single Intravitreous injection of highly purified ovine hyaluronidase (Vitrase®) for the management of vitreous hemorrhage. Am J Ophthalmol 2005." AMERICAN JOURNAL OF OPHTHALMOLOGY 140. (2005): 573-584. ( 1/2005 )
    PURPOSE: To evaluate the efficacy of intravitreous ovine hyaluronidase for the management of vitreous hemorrhage. DESIGN: Two prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-masked studies. Safety data are presented in a companion article in the journal. METHODS: Eligible patients with vitreous hemorrhage ≥1 month duration; severe at entry with best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) worse than 20/200 were randomized to 55 IU or 75 IU ovine hyaluronidase or saline. Primary efficacy (clearance of hemorrhage sufficient to see the underlying pathology and completion of treatment when indicated) was measured at months 1, 2, and 3. Key secondary endpoints were: ≥3-line improvement in BCVA; hemorrhage density reduction; and therapeutic utility assessment. RESULTS: The intent-to-treat population for common dose groups (55 IU, 75 IU, saline) consisted of 1125 patients. At baseline, 76.3% had diabetes, 90.4% were not able to read any letters on the eye chart, and mean hemorrhage duration was 120 days. Statistical significance was reached in the 55 IU dose group by months 1 and 2 for the primary efficacy endpoint based on an adjusted P-value. By months 1, 2, and 3, 13.2%, 25.5%, and 32.9% of patients (55 IU) reached primary efficacy compared with 5.5%, 16.2%, and 25.6% of saline-treated patients (P < .001; P = .002; P = .025, respectively). Key secondary endpoints confirmed the treatment effect at both doses and all timepoints (P ≤ .01). CONCLUSIONS: Fifty-five IU ovine hyaluronidase showed statistically significant efficacy as early as months 1 and 2. These results were supported by outcomes for three key secondary endpoints. These results suggest a therapeutic utility of ovine hyaluronidase in the management of vitreous hemorrhage.
  • Chan CK, Tarasewicz DG, Lin SG. "Subconjunctival Migration of Silicone Oil through a Baerveldt Pars Plana Glaucoma Implant." BR J OPHTHALMOL 89. (2005): 240-241. ( 1/2005 )
    Please see report
  • Chan CK, Tarasewicz DG, Lin SG. "Relation of Pre-LASIK and Post-LASIK Retinal Lesions and Retinal Examination for LASIK Eyes." BR J OPHTHALMOL 89. (2005): 299-301. ( 1/2005 )
    AIMS: Analysis of highly myopic eyes (mean myopia -11 D) with post-LASIK vitreoretinal complications (breaks, retinal detachment) that also had pre-LASIK vitreoretinal pathology (lattice, breaks). METHODS: Retrospective case series. RESULTS: 67 eyes in 56 patients with pre-LASIK retinal examination developed post-LASIK vitreoretinal complications. 17 of the 67 eyes (25.4%) had pre-LASIK vitreoretinal pathology. 10 of the 17 eyes that underwent pre-LASIK prophylactic retinal treatment still developed post-LASIK lesions. They developed adjacent to pre-LASIK lesions for 15 of 17 eyes (88.2%), and outside of quadrant(s) of pre-LASIK lesions for five eyes (29.4%). CONCLUSION: Pre-LASIK retinal examination may predict locations of certain post-LASIK retinal lesions that may develop in highly myopic eyes with pre-LASIK vitreoretinal pathology, but prophylactic treatment may not prevent all post-LASIK vitreoretinal complications.
  • Arevalo JF, Rodriguez FJ, Rosales-Meneses JL, Dessouki A, Chan CK, Mittra RA, Ruiz-Moreno JM. "Vitreoretinal surgery for macular hole after laser assisted in situ keratomileusis for the correction of myopia." BR J OPHTHALMOL 89. (2005): 1423-1426. ( 1/2005 )
    AIMS: To describe the characteristics and surgical outcomes of full thickness macular hole surgery after laser assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) for the correction of myopia. METHODS: 13 patients (14 eyes) who developed a macular hole after bilateral LASIK for the correction of myopia participated in the study. RESULTS: Macular hole formed 1-83 months after LASIK (mean 13 months). 11 out of 13 (84.6%) patients were female. Mean age was 45.5 years old (25-65). All eyes were myopic (range -0.50 to -19.75 dioptres (D); mean -8.4 D). Posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) was not present before and was documented after LASIK on 42.8% of eyes. Most macular hole were unilateral, stage 4 macular hole, had no yellow deposits on the retinal pigment epithelium, had no associated epiretinal membrane, were centric, and had subretinal fluid. The mean diameter of the hole was 385.3 microm (range 200--750 microm). A vitrectomy closed the macular hole on all eyes with an improvement on final best corrected visual acuity (VA) on 13 out of 14 (92.8%) patients. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that vitreoretinal surgery can be successful in restoring vision for most myopic eyes with a macular hole after LASIK.
  • Chan CK, Agarwal Am, Agarwal At, Agarwal S. "Surgical Management of the Malpositioned Intraocular Implant." COMP OPHTHALMOL UPDATE 5. (2004): 103-115. ( 7/2004 )
    Disturbing visual symptoms such as diplopia, metamorphopsia, hazy images, and shadows are associated with a subluxed or dislocated intraocular lens. If not properly managed, a malpositioned intraocular lens may induce sight-threatening ocular complications, including persistent cystoid macular edema, intraocular hemorrhage, retinal breaks, and retinal detachment. Contemporaneous with advances in phacoemulsification microsurgical techniques for removing cataracts, a number of highly effective surgical methods have been developed for managing a dislocated intraocular lens. A select series of such methods are described in this update. The primary aim of such methods is to reposition the dislocated intraocular lens close to the original site of the crystalline lens in an expeditious manner whenever possible, and with minimal morbidity as well as good visual outcome. The subluxation or dislocation of a posterior chamber intraocular lens along with the surrounding capsular bag has been described recently, particularly associated with cases of pseudoexfoliation syndrome. Successful strategies for managing such cases include implant removal, repositioning, or exchange.
  • Chan CK. "Retinal Complications after LASIK." REVIEW OPHTHALMOL May. (2004): 96-98. ( 7/2004 )
    Please see report
  • Chan CK, Arévalo JF, Akbatur HH, Sengün A, Yoon YH, Lee GJ, Tarasewicz DG, Lin SG. "Characteristics of Sixty Myopic Eyes with Pre-laser in Situ Keratomileusis Retinal Examination and Post-laser in Situ Keratomileusis Retinal Lesions." RETINA 24. (2004): 706-713. ( 7/2004 )
    PURPOSE: A survey of eyes with pre-laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) retinal examinations and characteristics of post-LASIK retinal breaks and retinal detachments (RDs). METHODS: A survey of worldwide vitreoretinal surgeons (424 physicians). Surveyed information included demographics, best-corrected visual acuity, degree of myopia, pre- and post-LASIK retinal findings, follow-up time, and treatment outcome. RESULTS: Sixty eyes with pre-LASIK retinal examinations developed post-LASIK retinal breaks and RDs. There was an average of 2.3 breaks per eye, yielding a total of 140 breaks in the 60 eyes. Forty eyes also had RDs besides the retinal breaks. Large percentages of eyes had substantial myopia (mean myopia, -9.5 +/- 5.8 diopters [D]) and complex vitreoretinal complications. Forty percent developed vitreoretinal complications within 6 months after LASIK. The 20 eyes that developed more extensive RDs (>3 clock hours) had a significantly higher mean myopia than did the 6 eyes that developed limited RD (< or = 3 clock hours) within 12 months after LASIK (-8.92 +/- 6.82 D versus -3.50 +/- 1.97 D, P = 0.03). There were significant statistical differences in distribution of retinal breaks and tears between the temporal and nasal quadrants (P < 0.001, P < 0.001, respectively, chi2, but not between the superior and inferior quadrants. CONCLUSION: Distributions of retinal breaks in this study were comparable with results found in non-LASIK eyes in young myopes. Treatment for post-LASIK vitreoretinal complications was highly successful. The vulnerability of such highly myopic eyes for vitreoretinal complications warrants their close monitoring.
  • Chan CK, Lin SG. "Retinal Lesions and LASIK." Ocular Surgery News 21.22.3 (2003): 138-139. ( 11/2003 )
    Please see report.
  • Chan CK, Gass JDM, Lin SG. "Acute Exudative Polymorphous Vitelliform Maculopathy Syndrome." RETINA 23. (2003): 453-462. ( 1/2003 )
    PURPOSE: The authors describe clinical characteristics of acute exudative polymorphous vitelliform maculopathy syndrome, also termed polymorphous maculopathy syndrome (PMS), an unusual tapetoretinal disorder first reported by Gass. METHODS: Detailed ophthalmoscopy, fluorescein angiography, electrophysiology, and optical coherence tomography (OCT) were performed on a patient with PMS. RESULTS: Numerous small, yellowish lesions arranged in a honeycombed pattern at the level of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) around the disk and the macula, a shallow macular detachment (documented by OCT), and a perifoveolar yellow ring appeared in both eyes. Initial fluorescein angiography revealed mild early hyperfluorescence and late staining of the perifoveolar rings and the multifocal yellow lesions. Gradually, subretinal yellowish deposits gravitated as a meniscus below the macula with subsequent further changes. Electrophysiology showed reduced amplitudes of the electroretinogram and electrooculogram and abnormal dark adaptometry. A rhegmatogenous retinal detachment in the left eye was successfully repaired, with a visual acuity of 20/30. Antecedent upper respiratory infection and headaches and positive serology for the coxsackie virus suggest the possibility of a virus-induced disorder. Genetic studies of this patient showed normal DNA sequences for the bestrophin and peripherin/RDS genes. CONCLUSION: This is the first report of PMS with the following characteristics: occurrence in a woman, development of a rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, and electroretinogram, visual-evoked response, color vision, and OCT findings. PMS has features similar to but also different from those of Harada disease and Best disease. Further studies are necessary to determine its relationship to other acquired conditions, such as virus-induced disorders, and genetic defects unrelated to abnormalities of the bestrophin and peripherin/RDS genes.
  • Chan, CK, Lawrence FC. "Macular hole after laser in-situ keratomileusis and photorefractive keratotomy." AM J OPHTHALMOL 131. (2001): 666-667. ( 1/2001 )
    PURPOSE: To describe three myopic patients who developed unilateral macular hole after undergoing bilateral laser in situ keratomileusis or photorefractive keratectomy. METHODS: Case reports. RESULTS: Three eyes of three myopic patients developed a macular hole in one eye after bilateral laser in situ keratomileusis or photorefractive keratectomy. The macular hole formed between 4 to 7 weeks after laser in situ keratomileusis in case 1 (a 48-year-old woman), and within 2 months after laser in situ keratomileusis in case 2 (a 36-year-old woman). In case 3 (a 45-year-old man), the macular hole was found 9 months after photorefractive keratectomy. A vitrectomy closed the macular hole of case 1 with final best-corrected visual acuity of 20/25 and case 2 with 20/30, whereas case 3 declined further surgery. CONCLUSION: A macular hole may develop in myopic eyes after laser in situ keratomileusis or photorefractive keratectomy. Vitreoretinal interface changes may play a role.
  • Chan CK, Wessels IF, Friedrichsen EJ. "Treatment of Idiopathic Macular Holes by Induced Posterior Vitreous Detachment." OPHTHALMOLOGY 102. (1995): 757-767. ( 1/1995 )
    PURPOSE: To determine if an expansile gas bubble can relieve vitreofoveal traction without vitrectomy by inducing a posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) in eyes with an idiopathic impending or full-thickness macular hole (stages 1-3). The status of the impending and full-thickness macular holes after gas injection and tamponade also was studied secondarily. METHODS: Eighteen patients participated in this pilot study. Eleven patients with an impending macular hole (stages 1A and 1B) and seven patients (8 eyes) with a full-thickness macular hole (stages 2 and 3) received gas injections and prospectively were followed for an average of 15.6 months (range, 3-42 months). RESULTS: A complete PVD was achieved in 18 of 19 eyes without a prior PVD within 2 to 9 weeks after gas injection. Ten of the 11 impending holes (all 7 had stage 1A holes; 3 of 4 had stage 1B holes) resolved after gas injection. After gas tamponade, three of six early full-thickness (stage 2) macular holes closed. None of the stage 3 macular holes closed after gas injection. The mean best-corrected visual acuity of the successful eyes was 20/32. There were no major complications. CONCLUSION: An expansile gas bubble consistently can induce a PVD in aging eyes. The ability of an expansile gas bubble to induce a PVD with minimal morbidity and expense may have clinical applications for macular hole therapy. Impending macular holes may resolve and some early full-thickness (stage 2) macular holes may close after gas injection and tamponade without vitrectomy. The efficacy and safety of this procedure may be evaluated further in the context of a carefully designed prospective and randomized study for selected patients with an idiopathic impending or early macular hole.
  • Schatz H, McDonald HR, Johnson RN, Chan CK, Alexander RI, Berger AR, Folk JC, Robertson DM.. "Subretinal Fibrosis in Central Serous Chorioretinopathy." OPHTHALMOLOGY 102. (1995): 1077-1085. ( 1/1995 )
    PURPOSE: To report unusual and heretofore unreported visually damaging manifestations of severe central serous chorioretinopathy. METHODS: Case studies. RESULTS: Each of six male patients (average age, 40 years) had a form of severe central serous chorioretinopathy with at least one eye containing fibrin in the subretinal space that then developed into a subretinal fibrotic scar. Scar formation was followed by a tenting up of the macula, vascularization of the fibrosis (subretinal neovascularization), or a retinal pigment epithelial rip. Four of the seven eyes with subretinal fibrosis had severe visual loss (20/400 or worse). CONCLUSION: Subretinal fibrin and other extracellular matrix molecules appear to stimulate the retinal pigment epithelium to undergo fibrous metaplasia, which results in subretinal fibrotic scar formation and other sequelae, all of which can lead to severe visual loss.
  • Chan CK, Kempin SJ, Noble SK, Palmer GA. "The Treatment of Choroidal Neovascular Membranes by Alpha Interferon: An Efficacy and Toxicity Study." OPHTHALMOLOGY 101. (1994): 289-300. ( 1/1994 )
    PURPOSE: The purpose of this phase 2 study was to determine the potential efficacy and safety of systemic alpha interferon in the treatment of subfoveal choroidal neovascularization associated with age-related macular degeneration or ocular histoplasmosis. METHOD: Subcutaneous alpha interferon was administered to 24 patients (24 eyes), and they were prospectively studied. Alpha interferon was administered subcutaneously four times daily at a dose of 3 x 10(6) U/m2 (average total dose, 204 MU). The studied parameters included best-corrected visual acuity, membrane size, blood, exudates, and subretinal fluid. Toxic effects and performance status were graded according to the National Cancer Institute toxicity criteria and Karnofsky performance scale, respectively. RESULTS: Of the 24 treated eyes, 5 (21%) showed objective evidence of anatomic improvement, as defined by decrease in membrane size or improvement in fluorescein angiographic characteristics, but in only 3 of these 5 was the improvement maintained. The same three patients achieved and maintained functional success (visual improvement). Two of the five patients with initial anatomic improvement had subsequent membrane recurrence, which resulted in no visual change in one but visual loss in the other. For the majority of patients, the anatomic and visual status remained the same or became worse after treatment. All patients experienced some degree of adverse reactions involving multiple organ systems. Decreased performance status affected 80% of the patients. CONCLUSION: This study documents that regression of choroidal neovascularization that occurred with alpha interferon treatment was minimal. Toxic effects interfering with patients' performance status are associated with alpha interferon treatment. Although a randomized trial of interferon versus no therapy may be warranted, fundamental issues (i.e., the biologic properties of interferon versus other more potent agents against choroidal neovascularization, medication dosages, and routes of administration), need to be addressed before embarking on such a trial.
  • Chan CK. "An Improved Technique for Management of Dislocated Posterior Chamber Implants." OPHTHALMOLOGY 99. (1992): 51-57. ( 1/1992 )
    Many techniques for repositioning dislocated posterior chamber implants described in the recent literature involve intricate intraocular manipulation of a needle or other sharp instrument. The author describes an improved sulcus fixation technique, which combines the best features of external and internal approaches. Its main features involve temporary externalization of the haptics for easy and secured placement of suture knots, and subsequent reinternalization of the same haptics through horizontal sclerotomies directly external to the ciliary sulcus for precise fixation of the dislocated posterior chamber implant with consistency. Between May 1989 and December 1990, this technique was successfully used for posterior chamber intraocular lens repositioning in 12 cases. The main advantages of this technique include: (1) easy suture placement, (2) less chance of suture slippage with the secured knots, and (3) avoidance of difficult intraocular maneuvers and possible tissue injury. This improved technique expedites the process of posterior chamber implant repositioning.
  • Chan CK, Wessels IF. "Chronic Macular Detachment following Pneumatic Retinopexy [Letter]." RETINA 11. (1991): 360-360. ( 1/1991 )
    Please see report.
  • Chan CK, Wessels IF. "Delayed Absorption of Subretinal Fluid after Pneumatic Retinopexy [letter] ." OPHTHALMOLOGY 97. (1990): 695-696. ( 1/1990 )
    Please see report
  • Chan CK, Wessels IF. "Delayed Absorption of Subretinal Fluid [letter]." OPHTHALMOLOGY 97. (1990): 961-962. ( 1/1990 )
    Please see report
  • Chan CK, Wessels IF. "Delayed Subretinal Fluid Absorption after Pneumatic Retinopexy." OPHTHALMOLOGY 96. (1989): 1691-1700. ( 1/1989 )
    Eight of 38 eyes consecutively treated with pneumatic retinopexy were found to have delayed subretinal fluid absorption (DSRFA). In six of eight eyes, a shallow pocket of loculated fluid developed with small subretinal pigment precipitates, possibly a unique feature associated with pneumatic retinopexy. Although loculated DSRFA may not affect the anatomic success, poor visual outcome can result if the macula is involved (4 eyes). Loculated submacular DSRFA may cause bothersome postoperative symptoms, because its resolution may be prolonged for months. Factors found significantly associated with DSRFA were subretinal precipitates and heavy cryotherapy. Demarcation lines, dependent subretinal fluid by the macula, long duration of detachment, and phakic status were factors more frequently found in eyes with than without DSRFA, although the correlations lacked statistical significance. A detailed description of loculated DSRFA after pneumatic retinopexy not found in the literature is presented.
  • Chan CK, Olk RJ, Arribas NP, Escoffery RF, Grand MG, Schoch LH. "Supplemental Photocoagulation on the Buckle for Prevention of Surgical Revision after Scleral buckling Procedures." ARCH OPHTHALMOL 105. (1987): 490-496. ( 1/1987 )
    Supplemental photocoagulation on the buckle appears to be a useful therapeutic modality in selected cases of persistent retinal detachment. In a retrospective review, 71 (63%) of 113 eyes were successfully treated with photocoagulation, thus avoiding the need for surgical revision. Median response time between treatment and postoperative subretinal fluid absorption in the successfully treated eyes was two days, with the majority responding within one day. The one favorable prognostic factor was the use of a soft silicone segmental sponge. Unfavorable prognostic factors included the following: contour of subretinal fluid (combined, ie, both anterior and posterior to the buckle); excessive amount of subretinal fluid; inadequate support of break(s); multiple drainages at first operation; rolled edge in association with a giant break; and residual vitreous traction on the break. Postoperative photocoagulation alone on the buckle did not appear to influence the rate of development of premacular fibroplasia or proliferative vitreoretinopathy.
  • Chan CK, Okun E. "The Question of Ocular Tolerance to Intravitreal Liquid Silicone, A Long Term Analysis ." OPHTHALMOLOGY 93. (1986): 651-660. ( 1/1986 )
    Please see report
  • Chan CK, Huffaker G. "Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus and Contralateral Hemiparesis." J CLINICAL NEUR OPHTHALMOL 1983. (1983): 111-119. ( 1/1983 )
  • Chan CK, McNeill J. "Corneal Transplantation: Current Concepts and Considerations. ." LOMA LINDA UNIVERSITY SURGEONS 01.1 (1982): 11-19. ( 1/1982 )
    Please see report
  Books and Chapters
  • Condon GP, Chan CK, Agarwal A. Management of Dislocated Intraocular Lenses. In: Agarwal A, Jacob S, eds. Posterior Capsular Rupture: a Practical Guide to Prevention and Management. 1st ed. Thorofare, NJ: SLACK Incorporated; 2013:165-183.

    ( 0/2013 )
  • Chan CK.  Retinal detachment.  In: Color Atlas of Ophthalmology 2nd edition, Agarwal A, ed., Thieme Medical Publishers. New York, New York, 2009.

    ( 0/2009 )
  • Chan CK, Tarasewicz DG, Surgical Retina.In Agarwal A, Jacobs S eds. Color Atlas of Ophthalmology 2nd edition, Chapter 10, pp 288-321, Thieme Medical Publishers. New York, New York, 2009.

    ( 0/2009 )
  • Chan CK, Lin SG. Management of Dislocated Lens and Lens Fragments by the Vitreoretinal Approach. In: MASTERING THE PHACODYNAMICS (TOOLS, TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATIONS), Chapter 56. New Delhi: Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd, 2007. 477 - 484 ( 1/2007 )
  • Agarwal Am, Agarwal At, Agarwal S, Chan CK. Complications, In: Phacoemulsification, Chapter 3, 1st edition, Agarwal S, Agarwal At, Agarwal Am, editors . New Delhi: Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd, 2007. 82 - 170 ( 1/2007 )
  • Chan CK. Managing Dislocated Lens Fragments. In: Phaco Nightmares, Conquering Cataract Catastrophies. Thorofare, New Jersey: Slacks Incorporated, 2006. 325 - 342 ( 1/2006 )
  • Chan CK. Surgical Management Of The Malpositioned Intraocular Implant. In: Phaco Nightmares, Conquering Cataract Catastrophies. Thorofare, New Jersey: Slacks Incorporated, 2006. 343 - 357 ( 1/2006 )
  • Chan CK, Lin SG. Infectious Endophthalmitis. In: Phaco Nightmares, Conquering Cataract Catastrophies. Thorofare, New Jersey: Slacks Incorporated, 2006. 359 - 371 ( 1/2006 )
  • Tarasewicz DG, Chan CK. Peripheral Retinal Degenerative Lesions. In: HANDBOOK OF OPHTHALMOLOGY, Chapter 14, 1st edition, Agarwal AM, editor. Thorofare, New Jersey: Slack Incorporated, 2005. 475 - 486. ( 10/2005 )
  • Chan CK, Tarasewicz DG. Retinal Detachment. In: HANDBOOK OF OPHTHALMOLOGY, Chapter 15, 1st edition, Agarwal AM, editor. Thorofare, New Jersey: Slack Incorporated, 2005. 487 - 494. ( 10/2005 )
  • Agarwal Am, Agarwal S, Agarwal At, Pandey SK, Chan CK. FAVIT: A Technique for Removing Dropped Nucleus During Phacoemulsification. In: Step by Step PHACO, Chapter 7, 1st edition, Agarwal S et al, editors. New Delhi: Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd, 2005. 113 - 123. ( 1/2005 )
  • Agarwal Am, Chan CK, Agarwal At, Agarwal S.. Surgical Management of the Malpositioned Intraocular Implant. In: Step by Step PHACO, Chapter 8, 1st edition, Agarwal S et al, editors. New Delhi: Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd, 2005. 125 - 154. ( 1/2005 )
  • Agarwal Am, Chan CK, Sachdev MS. Complications of Bimanual Phaco. In: Bimanual Phaco, Mastering the Phakonit/MICS Technique, Chapter 19, 1st edition, Agarwal AM et al, editors. Thorofare, New Jersey: Slacks Incorporated, 2005. 179 - 195. ( 1/2005 )
  • Chan CK. Managing Dislocated Lens Fragments. In: Bimanual Phaco, Mastering the Phakonit/MICS Technique, Chapter 20, 1st edition, Agarwal AM et al, editors. Thorofare, New Jersey: Slacks Incorporated, 2005. 197 - 211. ( 1/2005 )
  • Chan CK, Lin SG. Management of Dislocated Lens and Lens Fragments by Vitreoretinal Approach. In: CLINICAL PRACTICE IN SMALL INCISION CATARACT SURGERY (PHACO MANUAL), Chapter 49, 1st edition, Garg A et al, editors. New Delhi: Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd, 2004. 524 - 531 ( 7/2004 )
  • Chan CK, Schultz GR. Management of Dislocated Implants by Vitreoretinal Approach. In: CLINICAL PRACTICE IN SMALL INCISION CATARACT SURGERY (PHACO MANUAL), Chapter 50, 1st edition, Garg A, editors. New Delhi: Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd, 2004. 532 - 541 ( 7/2004 )
  • Chan CK, Lin SG. Management of Dislocated Lens and lens Fragments by the Vitreoretinal Approach. In: PHACOEMULSIFICATION, Volume 2, Chapter 74, 3rd edition, Agarwal S et al, editors. New Delhi: Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd, 2004. 781 - 788 ( 7/2004 )
  • Chan CK, Lin SG. Management of Dislocated IOLs by the Vitreoretinal Approach. In: PHACOEMULSIFICATION, Volume 2, Chapter 75, 3rd edition, Agarwal S et al, editors. New Delhi: Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd, 2004. 789 - 798 ( 7/2004 )
  • Agarwal Am, Agarwal S, Agarwal At, Pandey SK, Chan CK. FAVIT: A Technique for Removing Dropped Nucleus During Phacoemulsification. In: PHACOEMULSIFICATION, Volume 2, Chapter 76, 3rd edition, Agarwal S et al, editors. New Delhi: Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd, 2004. 799 - 803. ( 7/2004 )
  • Chan CK, Schultz GR. Management of Dislocated Implants by the Vitreoretinal Approach. In: ADVANCES IN OPHTHALMOLOGY, Vol 1, Chapter 12, 1st edition, Garg A et al, editors. New Delhi: Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd, 2003. 109 - 117 ( 1/2003 )
  • Chan CK, Lin SG. Management of Dislocated Lens and Lens Fragments by the Vitreoretinal Approach. In: TEXTBOOK OF OPHTHALMOLOGY, GLAUCOMA, LENS, UVEAL TRACT, OCULAR THERAPEUTICS, Chapter 216, Volume 3, 1st edition. Agarwal et al, editors. New Delhi: Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd, distributed by Slacks Incorporated, 2002. 1950 - 1955 ( 1/2002 )
  • Chan CK, Schultz GR. Management of Dislocated Implants by the Vitreoretinal Approach. In: TEXTBOOK OF OPHTHALMOLOGY, GLAUCOMA, LENS, UVEAL TRACT, OCULAR THERAPEUTICS, Chapter 217, 1st edition. Agarwal et al, editors. New Delhi: Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd, distributed by Highlights of Ophthalmology , 2002. 1956 - 1963 ( 1/2002 )
  • Chan CK, Lin SG. Scleral Buckling for the Repair of Retinal Detachment. In: TEXTBOOK OF OPHTHALMOLOGY, RETINA AND VITREOUS, SYSTEMIC DISEASES, MISCELLANEOUS, Volume 4, Chapter 294, 1st edition. Agarwal et al, editors. New Delhi: Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) LtD , distributed by Slack Incorporated, 2002. 2691 - 2716 ( 1/2002 )
  • Chan CK, Lin SG. Complications Associated with Scleral Buckling Procedures. In: TEXTBOOK OF OPHTHALMOLOGY, RETINA AND VITREOUS, SYSTEMIC DISEASES, MISCELLANEOUS, Volume 4, Chapter 295, 1st edition. Agarwal et al, editors. New Delhi: Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd, distributed by Slack Incorporated, 2002. 2717 - 2723 ( 1/2002 )
  • Chan CK, Lin SG. Management of Dislocated Lens Fragments. In: PHAKO, PHAKONIT, AND LASER PHAKO, A QUEST FOR THE BEST, Section VII. Complications, Chapter 44, 1st edition, Agarwal S et al, editors. Columbia: Highlights of Ophthalmology Inc, distributed by Highlights of Ophthalmology and Slacks Incorporated, 2002. 471 - 484 ( 1/2002 )
  • Chan CK, Lin SG. Current Concepts in Managing Infectious Endophthalmitis: A Comprehensive Review. In: PHAKO, PHAKONIT, AND LASER PHAKO, A QUEST FOR THE BEST, Section VII. Complications, Chapter 47, 1st edition, Agarwal S et al, editors. Columbia: Highlights of Ophthalmology Inc, distributed by Highlights of Ophthalmology and Slacks Incorporated, 2002. 505 - 534 ( 1/2002 )
  • Chan CK, Agarwal R, Agarwal S, Agarwal A. Management of Dislocated Intraocular Implants. In: OPHTHALMOLOGY CLINICS OF NORTH AMERICA, Volume 14, No.4, Posterior Segment Complications of Cataract Surgery, p 681-693, P Nagpal, IH Fine, guest editors. Philadelphia: WB Saunders, Elsevier, 2001. 681 - 693 ( 12/2001 )
  • Chan CK, Lin SG. Management of Dislocated Lens and Lens Fragments by the Vitreoretinal Approach. In: PHACOEMULSIFICATION, LASER CATARACT SURGERY AND FOLDABLE IOLs, p 417-423, 2nd edition. Agarwal et al, editors. New Delhi: Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd, distributed via Highlights of Ophthalmology, 2000. 417 - 423 ( 1/2000 )
  • Chan CK, Schultz GR. Management of Dislocated Implants by the Vitreoretinal Approach. In: PHACOEMULSIFICATION, LASER CATARACT SURGERY AND FOLDABLE IOLs, pp 424-428, 2nd edition. Agarwal et al, editors. New Delhi: Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd, distributed by Highlights of Ophthalmology , 2000. 424 - 428 ( 1/2000 )
  • Chan CK, Wessels IF. Delayed Fluid Absorption After Pneumatic Retinopexy. YEAR BOOK OF OPHTHALMOLOGY, Benson W, editor, Wills Eye Hospital. St. Louis, Missouri: CV Mosby, 1991. 238 - 239 ( 1/1991 )
  • Chan CK, Olk RJ, Arribas NP, Escoffery RF, Grand MG, Schoch LH. Inclusion of illustration from article: Supplemental Photocoagulation on the Buckle for Prevention of Surgical Revision after Scleral Buckling Procedures. In: Ophthalmic Surgery Loose leaf Workbook and Update Service, Lindquist TD, Lindstrom RL. Chicago, Illinois: Year Book Medical Publishers, 1990. ( 1/1990 )
  • Charles S. Editing references of book: Vitreous Microsurgery, 2nd edition, Kist K, editor, . Baltimore, Maryland: Williams and Wilkins, 1987. ( 1/1987 )
  Non-Scholarly Journals
  • Chan CK, Arakaki AA"Introducing the Coachella Valley and Palm Springs in anticipation for the ASRS 25th anniversary and annual meeting 2007, LEISURE and TRAVEL section ." RETINA TIMES 01 08 2007: 38 - 40 ( 8/2007 )
  • Chan CK"Temporary haptic externalization helps control IOL repositioning procedure." Ocular Surgery News, Europe/Asia-Pacific Edition Volume 17, No. 6, June 2006 01 06 2006: 39 - 39 ( 6/2006 )
  • Publication in the Desert Sun, Palm Springs, California - Publication in the "Living Section" of newspaper, The Desert Sun. Full page article: Focus on the Future. ( 7/1992 )