Loma Linda University

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Helen Marshak, PhD
Associate Dean, Academic Affairs, School of Public Health
School of Public Health
Associate Professor, School of Public Health
School of Public Health
Associate Professor, Psychology
Publications    Scholarly Journals--Published
  • McKenzie, M., Modeste, N.N., Marshak, H.H., & Wilson, C. (2014). Religious involvement and health-related behaviors among Black Seventh-day Adventists in Canada. Health Promotion Practice,?,1-7.

    ( 10/2014 ) Link...
  • Lino, S., Marshak, H.H., Herring, R.P., Belliard, J.C., Hilliard, C., Campbell, D., & Montgomery, S. (2014). Using the theory of planned behavior to explore attitudes and beliefs about dietary supplements among HIV-positive black women. Complementary Therapies in Medicine, 22(2), 400-408. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ctim.2014.03.002 ( 10/2014 ) Link...
  • Becerra, M.B., Herring, P., Marshak, H.H., & Banta, J.E. (2014 ). Social determinants of physical activity among adult Asian-Americans: Results from a population-based survey in California. Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health. DOI: 10.1007/s10903-014-0074-z ( 10/2014 ) Link...
  • Nguyen, S.D., Marshak, H.H., Dos Santos, H., Luu, S.M., Berk, L.S., & McMahon, P.T., & Riggs, M. (2014). The effects of simultaneous exercise and psychotherapy on depressive symptoms in inpatient, psychiatric older adults. Advances in Mind-Body Medicine, 28(4), 8-17.

    ( 10/2014 )
  • Nelson, A., Modeste, N., Marshak, H.H., & Hopp, J.W. (2014). Using the theory of planned behavior to predict infant restraint use in Saudi Arabia. Saudi Medical Journal. DOI:10.1080/15389588.2014.931578, http://smj.psmmc.med.sa/index.php/smj/article/view/9106/6470

    ( 9/2014 ) Link...
  • Nelson, A., Modeste, N., Marshak, H.H., & Hopp, J.W. (2014). Saudi women’s beliefs on the use of car infant restraints: A qualitative study. Traffic Injury Prevention. DOI:10.1080/15389588.2014.931578, http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15389588.2014.931578#.VFQK_a10w3w

    ( 7/2014 ) Link...
  • Salud, M.C., Marshak, H.H., Natto, Z.S., & Montgomery, S. (2013). Exploring HIV-testing intentions in young Asian/Pacific Islander (API) women as it relates to acculturation, theory of gender and power (TGP), and the AIDS risk reduction model (ARRM). AIDS Care: Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV, 26(5), 642-647. ( 11/2013 ) Link...
  • Trieu, S.L., Marshak, H.H., & Bratton, S.I. (2013). Sexual and reproductive health behaviors of Asian Pacific Islander community college students. Community College Journal of Research and Practice, 37(6), 467-477.

    ( 11/2013 )
  • Becerra, M.B., Herring, P., Marshak, H.H., & Banta, J.E. (2013). Association between acculturation and binge drinking among Asian-Americans: Results from the California Health Interview Survey. Journal of Addiction, Article ID 248196, 10 pages.

    ( 10/2013 ) Link...
  • Jones, V., Modeste, N., Marshak, H.H., & Fox, C. (2013). The effect of HIV/AIDS education on adolescents in Trinidad and Tobago, ISRN Infectious Diseases, 26(3), 1-8. Article ID 691054, 8 pages, doi:10.5402/2013/691054

    ( 6/2013 ) Link...
  • Gamboa-Maldonado, T., Marshak, H.H., Sinclair, R., Montgomery, S., & Dyjack, D. T. (2012). Building capacity for community disaster preparedness: A call for collaboration between public environmental health and emergency preparedness and response programs. Journal of Environmental Health, 75(2), 24-29. ( 10/2012 ) Link...
  • Trieu, S.L., Shenoy, D.P., Marshak, H.H., & Bratton, S.I.  (2011). Provision of emergency contraception among student health centers in California community colleges. Women’s Health Issues, 21(6), 431-437. ( 11/2011 ) Link...
  • Trieu, S.L., Marshak, H.H., & Bratton, S.I.  (2011). Sexual and reproductive health behaviors of California community college students. Journal of American College Health, 59(8), 1-7. ( 10/2011 ) Link...
  • Deavenport, A., Modeste, N.N., Marshak, H.H., & Neish, C.M. (2011). Closing the gap in mammogram screening: An experimental intervention among low-income Hispanic women in community health clinics. Health Education and Behavior, 38(5), 452-461. ( 10/2011 ) Link...
  • Trieu, S.L., Modeste, N.N., Marshak, H.H., Males, M.A., Bratton, S.I.  (2010). Partner communication and HIV testing among U.S. Chinese college students. American Journal of Health Behavior, 34 (3), 362-373. ( 6/2010 ) Link...
  • Deavenport, A., Modeste, N.N., Marshak, H.H., & Neish, C.M. (2010). Health beliefs of low-income Hispanic women: A disparity in mammogram use. American Journal of Health Studies, 25 (2), 92-101.

    ( 4/2010 ) Link...
  • Zografos, K., Marshak, H.H., Dyjack, D.T., & Neish, C. (2010). The effects of an adolescent asthma education intervention on knowledge, intention, behavior, self-efficacy and self-consciousness.  Californian Journal of Health Promotion, 8(1), 60-71. ( 1/2010 ) Link...
  • Barilla, D.J., Marshak, H.H., Anderson, E., & Hopp, J. (2010).  Post-partum follow-up: Can Psychosocial Support Reduce Newborn Readmissions? The American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing, 35 (1), 33-39.

    ( 1/2010 ) Link...
  • Diaz, H., Hopp Marshak, H., Montgomery, S., Rea, B., and Backman, D. (2009). Acculturation and gender: Influence on healthy dietary outcomes for Latino adolescents in California.  Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, 41(5), 319-326. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jneb.2009.01.003

    ( 10/2009 ) Link...
  • Trieu, S.L., Modeste, N.N., Marshak, H.H., Males, M.A., Bratton, S.I.  (2008).  Factors associated with the decision to obtain an HIV test among Chinese/Chinese American community college women in Northern California. California Journal of Health Promotion, 6(1). 111-127.

    ( 1/2008 )
  • Hopkins, G.L., McBride, D., Marshak, H.H., Freier, K., Stevens, J.V., Kannenberg, W., Weaver, J., Sargent, S., Landless, P, & Duffy, J. (2007). How to make healthy kids in health communities: Eight evidence based strategies for preventing high risk behaviors. Medical Journal of Australia, 186, S70-S73. ( 9/2006 - 9/2007 )
  • McBride, D.C., Freier, M.C., Hopkins, G.L., Babikian, T., Richardson, L., Helm, H., Boward, M.D., Marshak, H.H., & Sector Health Care Affairs (2005). Quality of parent-child relationship and adolescent HIV risk behaviour in St. Maarten. AIDS Care, 17 (Supplement 1), 45-54. ( 1/2005 - 12/2005 )
  • Shaw, S., Dyjack, D., Marshak, H.H., & Neish, C. (2005). Effects of a classroom-based asthma education curriculum on asthma knowledge, attitudes, self-efficacy, quality of life, and self-management behaviors among adolescents. American Journal of Health Education, 36(3), 140-147. ( 9/2004 - 9/2005 ) Link...
  • Rea, B., Marshak, H.H., Neish, C., & Davis, N. (2004). The role of health promotion in physical therapy in California, New York, and Tennessee. Journal of Physical Therapy, 84(6), 510-524. ( 9/2004 ) Link...
  • Giammattei, J., Blix, G., Marshak, H.H., Wollitzer, A.O., & Pettitt, D.J. (2003). Television watching and soft drink consumption: Associations with obesity in 11-13 year old school children. Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, 157(9), 882-886. ( 9/2003 - 9/2004 )
  • Henriques, C.E., Newton, D.R., & Marshak, H.H. (2003). Smoke-free parks: How a 12-year-old made this happen. Journal of Community Health, 28(2),131-138. ( 9/2003 - 9/2004 )
  • Anderson, B.A., Marshak, H.H., & Hebbeler, D.L. (2002). Identifying intimate partner violence at entry to prenatal care: Clustering routine clinical information. Journal of Midwifery and Women’s Health, 47(5), 353-359. ( 9/2002 - 9/2003 )
  • Baker, S.M., Marshak, H.H., Rice, G.T., & Zimmerman, G.J. (2001). Patient participation in physical therapy goal setting. Physical Therapy, 81, 1118-1126. ( 9/2001 - 9/2002 )
  • Haddock, B., Marshak, H.H.P., Mason, J.J., & Blix, G. (2000). The effect of hormone replacement therapy and exercise on cardiovascular disease risk factors in postmenopausal women. Sports Medicine, 29(1), 39-49. ( 9/2000 - 9/2001 )
  • Marshak, H.H., de Silva, P., & Silberstein, J. (1998). Evaluation of a peer-taught nutrition education program for low-income parents. Journal of Nutrition Education, 30 (5),314-322. ( 9/1998 - 9/1999 )
  • Haddock, B., Hopp, H.P., Mason, J.J., Blair, S. (1998). Cardiorespiratory fitness and cardiovascular disease risk factors in post-menopausal women. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 893-898. ( 9/1997 - 9/1998 )
  • Hopkins, G.L., Hopp, J.W., Marshak H.P.H., Neish, C., & Rhoads, G. (1998). AIDS Risk Among Students Attending Seventh-day Adventist Schools in North America. Journal of School Health, 69(4), 141-145. ( 9/1997 - 9/1998 )
  • Bic, Z., Blix, G.G., Hopp, H.P., & Leslie, F.M. (1998). In search of the ideal treatment for migraine headache. Medical Hypotheses, 50(1), 1-7. ( 9/1997 - 9/1998 )
  • Fries, E., Bowen, D.J., Hopp, H.P., & White, K.S. (1997). Psychological effects of dietary fat analysis and feedback: A randomized feedback design. Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 20(6), 607-19. ( 9/1996 - 9/1997 )
  • Hopkins, G.L., Hopp, J.W., Hopp, H.P., Neish, C., & Rhoads, G. (1997). AIDS risk among students attending SDA academies in North America, Journal of Adventist Education, 59(4), 36-39. ( 9/1996 - 9/1997 )
  • Modeste, N. N., Hopp, H.P., & Green, I. (1997). What do SDA high school students know in Trinidad and Tobago about AIDS?, Journal of Adventist Education, 59(4), 32-35. ( 9/1996 - 9/1997 )
  • Bowen, D.J., Fries, E., Thompson, B., & Hopp, H.P. (1996). Feasibility of a worksite-wide nutrition intervention. Journal of The Institute of Health Education, 34(3), 80-85. ( 9/1995 - 9/1996 )
  • Thompson, B., Fries, E., Hopp, H.P., Bowen, D.J., & Croyle, R.T. (1995). The feasibility of a proactive stepped care model for worksite smoking cessation. Health Education Research, 10(4), 455-465. ( 9/1994 - 9/1995 )
  • Bowen, D.J., Fries, E., & Hopp, H.P. (1994). Effects of dietary fat feedback on behavioral and psychological variables. Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 17(6), 589-604. ( 9/1993 - 9/1994 )
  • Thompson, B., Bowen, D.J., Croyle, R.T., Hopp, H.P., & Fries, E. (1991). Utilizing community organization to maximize worksite survey response rates. American Journal of Health Promotion, 6(2), 130-136. ( 9/1990 - 9/1991 )
  • Gamboa-Maldonado T, Marshak H H, Sinclair R, Montgomery S, & Dyjack D T. (2012). Building Capacity for Community Disaster Preparedness: A Call for Collaboration Between Public Environmental Health and Emergency Preparedness and Response Programs. Journal of Environmental Health, 75(2), 24-29. ( 9/2012 - Present )
    Partnerships among local public environmental health (EH), emergency preparedness and response (EPR) programs, and the communities they serve have great potential to build community environmental health emergency preparedness (EHEP) capacity In the study described in this article, the beliefs and organizational practices pertaining to community EHEP outreach and capacity were explored through key informant (KI) interviews (N = 14) with a sample of governmental EH and EPR administrators and top-level managers from Riverside and San Bernardino counties in Southern California. The results indicate that KIs were highly confident in their workforces' efficacy, ability, willingness, and motivation to directly engage local communities in EHEP. Best practices to combat organizational and systematic barriers to community EHEP outreach were identified. Based on the authors' results, training in participatory methods is needed to bridge technical knowledge in emergency management to daily practice. The lessons learned will form the basis of future interventions aimed to prepare EH and EPR professions to implement community-focused emergency preparedness strategies.
  • Trieu S L, Shenoy D P, Bratton S, & Marshak H H. (2011). Provision of Emergency Contraception at Student Health Centers in California Community Colleges. Womens Health Issues, 21(6), 431-437. ( 11/2011 - Present ) Link...
    Background: Approximately half of all pregnancies in the United States are unintended, with the highest rates reported among college-age women. The availability of emergency contraception (EC) pills can be an important component of efforts to reduce unintended pregnancy. Student health centers at community colleges can uniquely support student retention and academic achievement among college students by making EC available to reduce the rate of unintended pregnancy and prevent college drop-out. This article highlights findings from an assessment of EC provision in student health centers within the California community college system (n = 73). Methods: A web-based survey was used to explore the provision of EC, challenges and barriers of EC administration, promotion of EC availability, and attitudes toward EC. Findings: Descriptive statistics conducted revealed that more than 6 out of 10 (62%) student health centers provided EC, 77% of which dispense EC on site during clinic visits. The most common EC promotion methods were providing brochures at the health center (80%) and through information provided at family planning or primary care visits (73%). Challenges to EC administration included a perceived lack of awareness of EC among students (71%), followed by the notion that some students may overutilize EC (40%). Attitudes toward EC provision were more favorable among health center staff whose campuses offered EC than those who did not (p < .05). Conclusion: This article provides recommendations for community college health centers to improve access and delivery of EC by addressing issues such as cost and offering more novel EC promotion methods. Copyright (C) 2011 by the Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc.
  • Deavenport A, Modeste N, Marshak H H, & Neish C. (2011). Closing the Gap in Mammogram Screening: An Experimental Intervention Among Low-Income Hispanic Women in Community Health Clinics. Health Education & Behavior, 38(5), 452-461. ( 10/2011 - Present ) Link...
    A low rate of mammogram screening exists among low-income Hispanic women. To address this disparity, an experimental intervention containing audiovisual and written media was conducted using the health belief model as a framework. The purpose of this study was to determine if low-income Hispanic women, more than 40 years of age, who received targeted cancer prevention education (n = 105) had a significantly greater perceived threat of breast cancer, greater benefits and lower barriers to screening, and stronger intentions to obtain mammograms compared to a control group (n = 105). Intervention participants reported significantly greater perceived benefits, self-efficacy, and mammogram screening intentions than the control group. Predictors of mammogram screening intentions, when controlling for covariates, included receiving the intervention, and having greater perceived benefits, self-efficacy, and lower barriers. Results demonstrate the effectiveness of a low-cost, theory-based intervention aimed at increasing mammogram screening to assist in the monitoring of Healthy People 2020 objectives.
  • Trieu S L, Bratton S, & Marshak H H. (2011). Sexual and Reproductive Health Behaviors of California Community College Students. Journal of American College Health, 59(8), 744-750. ( 0/2011 - Present ) Link...
    Objective: To explore the sexual and reproductive health behaviors of students from 13 community college campuses in California. Participants: Heterosexual college students, ages 18 to 24, who have had sexual intercourse (N = 4,487). Methods: The American College Health Association's National College Health Assessment (ACHA-NCHA) survey was administered in class to randomly selected classrooms at 12 institutions and electronically to randomly selected e-mails of students at 1 institution from March through April 2007. Results: This sample of community college students reported higher rates of risky sexual behaviors, unintended pregnancy, emergency contraception, and sexually transmitted diseases, and lower rates of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing, than the overall ACHA-NCHA reference group. Those who had been tested for HIV reported more sexual partners, and lower rates of condom use. Conclusions: The data provide justification for broader educational programs and access to family planning services, condoms, and HIV testing on community college campuses.
  • Barilla D, Marshak H H, Anderson S E, & Hopp J W. (2010). POSTPARTUM FOLLOW-UP: Can Psychosocial Support Reduce Newborn Readmissions?. Mcn-the American Journal of Maternal-Child Nursing, 35(1), 33-39. ( 1/2010 - Present )
    Purpose. To determine whether there was a relationship between postpartum psychosocial support from healthcare providers and the rate of normal newborn readmissions (NNRs), and whether there was a cost benefit to justify an intervention. Study Design and Methods. Data were abstracted for all normal newborn births from 1999 to 2006 (N = 14,786) at a community hospital in southern California at three different time periods: (1) at baseline prior to any intervention (1999-2000), (2) the 4 years during the comprehensive psychosocial support intervention (2001-2004), and (3) the 2 years during a limited psychosocial support intervention (2004-2006). A cost-benefit analysis was performed to analyze whether the financial benefits from the intervention matched or exceeded the costs for NNRs. Results. There was a significantly lower readmission rate of 1.0% (p = <.001) during the comprehensive intervention time period compared to baseline (2.3%) or to the limited intervention time period (2.3%). Although there was no significant difference in the average cost per newborn readmitted across the three study time periods, during the comprehensive intervention time period the average costs of a NNR were significantly lower ($4,180, p = .041) for the intervention group compared to those who received no intervention ($5,338). There was a cost benefit of $513,540 due to fewer readmissions during the comprehensive time period, but it did not exceed the cost of the intervention. Clinical Implications. Providing comprehensive follow-up for new mothers in the postpartum period can reduce NNRs, thus lowering the average newborn readmission costs for those who receive psychosocial support. Followup for new mothers should be an accepted norm rather than the exception in postpartum care, but NNRs should not be considered the sole outcome in such programs.
  • Barilla D, Marshak H H, Anderson S E, & Hopp J W. (2010). POSTPARTUM FOLLOW-UP: Can Psychosocial Support Reduce Newborn Readmissions?. Mcn-the American Journal of Maternal-Child Nursing, 35(1), 33-39. ( 1/2010 - Present )
    Purpose. To determine whether there was a relationship between postpartum psychosocial support from healthcare providers and the rate of normal newborn readmissions (NNRs), and whether there was a cost benefit to justify an intervention. Study Design and Methods. Data were abstracted for all normal newborn births from 1999 to 2006 (N = 14,786) at a community hospital in southern California at three different time periods: (1) at baseline prior to any intervention (1999-2000), (2) the 4 years during the comprehensive psychosocial support intervention (2001-2004), and (3) the 2 years during a limited psychosocial support intervention (2004-2006). A cost-benefit analysis was performed to analyze whether the financial benefits from the intervention matched or exceeded the costs for NNRs. Results. There was a significantly lower readmission rate of 1.0% (p = <.001) during the comprehensive intervention time period compared to baseline (2.3%) or to the limited intervention time period (2.3%). Although there was no significant difference in the average cost per newborn readmitted across the three study time periods, during the comprehensive intervention time period the average costs of a NNR were significantly lower ($4,180, p = .041) for the intervention group compared to those who received no intervention ($5,338). There was a cost benefit of $513,540 due to fewer readmissions during the comprehensive time period, but it did not exceed the cost of the intervention. Clinical Implications. Providing comprehensive follow-up for new mothers in the postpartum period can reduce NNRs, thus lowering the average newborn readmission costs for those who receive psychosocial support. Followup for new mothers should be an accepted norm rather than the exception in postpartum care, but NNRs should not be considered the sole outcome in such programs.
  • Trieu S L, Modeste N N, Marshak H H, Males M A, & Bratton S I. (2010). Partner Communication and HIV Testing Among US Chinese College Students. American Journal of Health Behavior, 34(3), 362-373. ( 0/2010 - Present )
    Objectives: To explore the role of partner communication and relationship status on HIV testing among Chinese/Chinese American college students in northern California. Methods: We used a cross-sectional study design to conduct focus groups and an online or paper-pencil questionnaire (N=230). Results: The majority (60%) of respondents were in committed partnerships, with 21% in casual partnerships. Less than one third (30%) of respondents had ever obtained an HIV test. History of HIV tested was associated with relationship status and partner communication. Conclusions: Interventions to increase partner communication skills while taking into account sociocultural factors among this population and their partners are needed.
  • Trieu S L, Modeste N N, Marshak H H, Males M A, & Bratton S I. (2010). Partner Communication and HIV Testing Among US Chinese College Students. American Journal of Health Behavior, 34(3), 362-373. ( 0/2010 - Present )
    Objectives: To explore the role of partner communication and relationship status on HIV testing among Chinese/Chinese American college students in northern California. Methods: We used a cross-sectional study design to conduct focus groups and an online or paper-pencil questionnaire (N=230). Results: The majority (60%) of respondents were in committed partnerships, with 21% in casual partnerships. Less than one third (30%) of respondents had ever obtained an HIV test. History of HIV tested was associated with relationship status and partner communication. Conclusions: Interventions to increase partner communication skills while taking into account sociocultural factors among this population and their partners are needed.
  • Diaz H, Marshak H H, Montgomery S, Rea B, & Backman D. (2009). Acculturation and Gender: Influence on Healthy Dietary Outcomes for Latino Adolescents in California. Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, 41(5), 319-326. ( 9/2009 - Present ) Link...
    Objective: Examine acculturation and gender on intention to cat a healthful diet among Latino adolescents using the Theory of planned Behavior. Design: Secondary analysis of data set and condensed version of the Short Acculturation Scale for Hispanics (SASH). Setting: Data collected from 34 randomly selected high schools in San Bernardino. CA. Participants: 265 Latino high school idolescents. Main Outcome Measures: Effects of acculturation and gender on variables of the Theory of Planned Behavior on intention to cat a healthful diet. Analysis: Multiple regression analysis examined acculturation/gender differences, and modifications oil the prediction of intention. General linear modeling determined differences across gender and acculturation groups. Results: Females had stronger intention, more positive attitude, and greater subjective normative influence. Females indicated feeling healthy and looking good and males indicated good athletic performance as contributors to eating healthfully. Mother was influential for both genders, and stronger for females. Siblings were influential for less acculturated males, and friends were influential for highly acculturated females. Less acculturated adolescents had stronger intention to cat healthfully, more tolerance to give up liked food items, and more support and encouragement. Conclusions and Implications: professionals need to take into account gender and acculturation differences when making dietary rccommendations for Latino adolescents.
  • Raynor K J, Modeste N, Marshak H H, & Santos H D. (2009). Gender differences in perceptions of weight and body image and comparison to recommended weight among adult Bermudians. Int Q Community Health Educ, 30(2), 153-69. ( 0/2009 - Present ) Link...
    The objective of this study was to determine adult Bermudians' perceptions of ideal weight, overweight, and body image and to decide if a discrepancy exists between their perceptions and World Health Organization standards. A cross-sectional survey of body weight perceptions was administered to 462 men (n = 207) and women (n = 255), 18-65 years of age and various body weights, living on the Island of Bermuda. Additionally, measurement of height, and weight was collected. There was a significant difference in mean current body mass index (BMI) between men (M = 28.6, SD = 5.82), and women (M = 30.1, SD = 6.80) (p < .05). Significant gender differences were evident in mean self-perceived BMI, ideal BMI, and perceived body image. The data presented have important implications for understanding perceptions, knowledge, and beliefs concerning body weight and body image. Public health programs must stress to adults the correct definition of overweight and obesity acceptable by medical standards.
  • Newell M, Modeste N, Marshak H H, & Wilson C. (2009). HEALTH BELIEFS AND THE PREVENTION OF HYPERTENSION IN A BLACK POPULATION LIVING IN LONDON. Ethnicity & Disease, 19(1), 35-41. ( 0/2009 - Present )
    In the United Kingdom, the morbidity and mortality associated with hypertension is much higher in Blacks than in Whites. We studied a convenience sample of 312 persons aged 25-79 years from 17 predominantly Black Seventh-Day Adventist churches across London by using the health belief model to examine their beliefs about the prevention of hypertension. A questionnaire was used to collect demographic and anthropometric data, lifestyle practices, and perceptions toward hypertension by using the health belief model constructs of susceptibility, severity, benefits, barriers, and self-efficacy. A relative risk estimate score was developed to assess the presence of several risk factors of hypertension for each participant. Based on multiple regression analyses, the demographic variables were independent predictors of systolic blood pressure (R(2)=.195), the combined behavioral variable (risk score) was an independent predictor of diastolic blood pressure (beta=.18, P=.02), and self-efficacy was the only independent variable significantly associated with risk scores (beta=-.21, P-.008). The perception of self-efficacy to perform behaviors that will decrease hypertension risk needs to be effectively harnessed by health educators to decrease the prevalence of hypertension in this population. (Ethn Dis. 2009;19:35-41)
  Scholarly Journals--Accepted
  • Trieu, S.L., Modeste, N.N., Marshak, H.H., Males, M.A., Bratton, S.I. (accepted for publication). Factors associated with the decision to obtain an HIV test among Chinese/Chinese American community college women in Northern California. California Journal of Health Promotion, 6(1). ( 9/2007 - 9/2008 )
  • Diaz, H., Marshak, H.H., Montgomery, S., Rea, B., & Backman, D. (accepted for publication). Acculturation and gender: Influence on healthy dietary outcomes for Latino adolescents. Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior. ( 9/2007 - 9/2008 )
  • Newell, M., Modesete, N., Marshak, H.H., & Wilson, C. (accepted for publication). Health beliefs and the prevention of hypertension in a Black population living in London. Ethnicity & Disease. ( 9/2007 - 9/2008 )
  Books and Chapters
  • Thompson, B. & Hopp, H.P. (1991). Community-based programs for smoking cessation. In J. Rubin (Ed.). Clinics in chest medicine: Smoking cessation. Philadelphia, PA: W. B. Saunders, Co. ( 9/1990 - 9/1991 )
  Non-Scholarly Journals
  • Mason, J.J., & Marshak, H.H. (2001). Research conducted on winter game athletes. Pacesetters, 3, 17-18, 29. ( 9/2000 - 9/2001 )
  • Hopkins, G.L., Hopp, J., Hopp, H., Neish, C., & Rhoads, G. (1997). AIDS and Adventist Youth. In D.S. Williams, K. Kuzma, & L. Van Dolsen (Eds.).  Ministries of Health and Healing (pp. 140-144). ( 9/1996 - 9/1997 )
  • Hopkins, G.L., Hopp, J., Hopp, H., Neish, C., & Rhoads, G. (1997). AIDS and the Adventist Academy. Adventist Review, November, 12-15. ( 9/1996 - 9/1997 )
  • Hopkins, G.L., Hopp, J.W., Hopp, H.P., Neish, C., & Rhoads, G. (1996). AIDS in SDA youth. Ministry Magazine, 7, 22-27. ( 9/1995 - 9/1996 )