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Thelma Gamboa-Maldonado, DrPH
Assistant Professor, School of Public Health
School of Public Health
Presentations    Research Presentations -- National
  • Helping Vulnerable Urban and Rural Communities Respond to Emergencies-National Environmental Health (NEHA) Annual Meeting, Columbus, OH; Learning Lab ( 6/2011 )
  • Community-Based Participatory Research to Develop Environmental Health Emergency Resilience-APHA 2010 Annual Meeting; Oral Presentation ( 10/2010 )
    Thelma Gamboa-Maldonado, DrPH (c), MPH, CHES , School of Public Health, Dept. Health Promotion & Ed, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA Walleska I. Bliss, MPH , School of Public Health, Center for Public Health Preparedness, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA Helen Hopp Marshak, PhD , School of Public Health, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA Juan Carlos Belliard, PhD, MPH , School of Public Health, Department of Global Health, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA Susanne Montgomery, PhD , School of Public Health, Dept. Health Promotion & Ed, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA David T. Dyjack, DrPH , School of Public Health, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA      An inequitable distribution of resources and education leaves those isolated by geography, language, culture, or socioeconomic factors ill prepared and at risk for poor health outcomes during and after emergencies. In this mixed methods, quasi-experimental systems efficacy study, the conventional expert-driven, top-down approach to environmental health emergency preparedness (EHEP) will be compared to a community-based participatory approach in vulnerable communities of two inland Southern California counties. First, county environmental health (EH) employees from the intervention and control counties received standardized EHEP training to establish an EHEP knowledge baseline. Collective efficacy for community involvement in EHEP and EH employees'''' readiness to engage the community in implementing EHEP were also measured. Next, a needs and assets assessment was conducted in the intervention county using theory-based semi-structured key informant interviews and validation focus groups. The findings from this baseline assessment will be used to develop a community involved approach to readiness. Meanwhile, the control county was encouraged to proceed with their usual plans for readiness. Process evaluation findings from the initial assessments of employee knowledge of EHEP, readiness to engage the community in EHEP capacity building, and collective efficacy for effectively performing EHEP will be presented. Key barriers and facilitating factors related to community involvement with EHEP will be identified as will the communities'''' choice of approach to readiness. The results of the initial assessment provide the evidence base for determining whether the CBPR-approach to EHEP is superior to the traditional, expert-driven approach. Learning Areas: Administer health education strategies, interventions and programs Assessment of individual and community needs for health education Environmental health sciences Implementation of health education strategies, interventions and programs Planning of health education strategies, interventions, and programs Learning Objectives: By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to: 1. Identify three characteristics of county environmental health (EH) professionals related to readiness to engage vulnerable communities in emergency preparedness. 2. Identify two key barriers related to community involvement with EHEP. 3. Identify two key facilitating factors related to community involvement with EHEP. 4. Describe how to assess readiness to involve community members in EHEP when planning interventions and implementing EH policies within their own communities. Keywords: Environmental Health, Emergency
  Research Presentations -- Local/Campus
  • Building Capacity for Community Disaster Resilience: The Role of Public Environmental Health Departments in Meeting the Challenge-2011 Loma Linda University School of Public Health Dissertation Defense ( 5/2011 )
  Poster Presentation
  • Partnerships for Environmental Health Emergency Preparedness-National Environmental Health Association Annual Meeting ( 6/2011 )
  • Developing Environmental Health Emergency Resilience in Vulnerable Populations: A Community-Based Participatory Research Approach; APHA Annual Meeting ( 10/2010 )
    Thelma Gamboa-Maldonado, DrPH (c), MPH, CHES , School of Public Health, Dept. Health Promotion & Ed, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA Walleska I. Bliss, MPH , School of Public Health, Center for Public Health Preparedness, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA Helen Hopp Marshak, PhD , School of Public Health, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA Juan Carlos Belliard, PhD, MPH , School of Public Health, Department of Global Health, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA Susanne Montgomery, PhD , School of Public Health, Dept. Health Promotion & Ed, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA David T. Dyjack, DrPH , School of Public Health, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA An inequitable distribution of resources and education leaves those isolated by geography, language, culture, or socioeconomic factors vulnerable and at risk for poor health outcomes during and after emergencies. In this mixed methods, quasi-experimental study, the conventional expert-driven approach to environmental health emergency preparedness (EHEP) will be compared to a community-based participatory approach in vulnerable communities of two inland Southern California counties. First, county environmental health (EH) employees from the intervention and control counties received standardized EHEP training to establish an EHEP knowledge baseline. Collective efficacy for community involvement in EHEP and EH employees'''''''' readiness to engage the community in implementing EHEP were also measured. Next, a needs and assets assessment was conducted in the intervention county using theory-based semi-structured key informant interviews and validation focus groups. The control county proceeded EHEP as usual. The findings from this baseline assessment will be used to inform implementation of CBPR approach to EHEP. The goal is to empower and mobilize vulnerable communities to establish partnerships with local health departments and CBOs and, thus, move toward environmental justice. Process evaluation findings from the initial assessments of employee knowledge of EHEP, readiness to engage the community in EHEP capacity building, and collective efficacy for effectively performing EHEP will be presented. Key barriers and facilitating factors related to community involvement with EHEP and the communities'''''''' approach to readiness will be identified. The results of the initial assessment provide the evidence base for determining whether the CBPR-approach to EHEP is superior to the traditional, expert-driven approach. Learning Areas: Administer health education strategies, interventions and programs Assessment of individual and community needs for health education Environmental health sciences Implementation of health education strategies, interventions and programs Planning of health education strategies, interventions, and programs Public health or related research Learning Objectives: By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to: 1. Identify three barriers to environmental health emergency preparedness in vulnerable populations. 2. Identify three resources environmental health (EH) professionals can use to decrease inequities in environmental health emergency preparedness (EHEP) in vulnerable populations. 3. Describe how to assess readiness to involve community members in EHEP when planning interventions and implementing EH interventions to increase community empowerment and capacity building. Keywords: Environmental Justice, Community-Based Partnership