Loma Linda University

Enrollment Information
Call us at: 909-558-1000

Faculty Directory
  
Douglas Huenergardt, PhD
Associate Chair, Counseling and Family Science
School of Behavioral Health
Professor, Counseling and Family Science
Member, Counseling and Family Sci, SST, Faculty of Graduate Studies
Other LLU Classes Outside Of Schedule 
Lecture
 
3/2014 - 6/2014 MFTH 625 Grant Writing
This course is the second of three consecutive quarters in the DMFT Program Development sequence dedicated to extending MFT principles to Program Design, Grant Writing, and Evaluation. Because this course also can be taken by those in the Ph.D. program, this course is designed to prepare participants to seek and respond to two types of grant opportunities: 1) government and foundation program announcements seeking to fund services that will impact identified social and mental health problems or populations, and 2) research initiatives focused on reducing gaps in scientific knowledge, translating evidence-based knowledge into community settings, or training workers in evidence-based practice. Special emphasis will be placed on developing grant applications using the systemic/relational conceptual framework of Marriage and Family Therapy as a template for developing prevention, early intervention, or full-scale treatment programs. The MFT framework will also be used as the philosophical underpinning for developing research grants. Special focus will be devoted to using Internet web sites to access grantors? strategic plans, program announcements, or areas of interest. The course will also develop participants'' abilities to critique and strengthen grant applications.
1/2014 - 6/2014 Advanced Program Evaluation and Evaluation-2
In this second quarter of this course, DMFT students will refine DMFT project proposals based on critiques of their work. All students will present and defend proposals in one of the following three areas: 1) Development of a systemic/relational prevention, early intervention, or clinical treatment program that includes an evaluation methodology; 2) Evaluation of a funded program, implemented in a public or private setting; or 3)Creation of a systemic/relational therapeutic protocol designed to address a clinical or service delivery issue.
1/2014 - 3/2014 MFTH 626 Program Evaluation and Monitoring
The purpose for this course is to prepare participants to conduct formative and summative program evaluations using quantitative, qualitative, and mixed model designs. Special emphasis will be placed on evaluating programs and clinical outcomes using the systemic/relational perspective of Marriage and Family Therapy. The course will also develop participants'''' abilities to collaborate with stakeholders in developing evaluation plans that ensure evaluation reports meet the intended purposes and will be used for program decision-making. Types of evaluation research models include Assessing 1) Program Need, 2) Program Process and Performance (including client/participant outcomes and program outcomes), 3) Theory Applicability and Adherence, and 4) Impact Evaluation among others.
9/2013 - 12/2013 MFTH 506 Sysstemic Foundations of Marriage and Family Therapy
This course explores the philosophical underpinnings of systemic thought and its clinical application to the field of Family Therapy. Special study will be given to the role of recursive epistemology as it relates to theory of Marriage and Family Therapy. We will examine the field?s initial application of General Systems Theory using the paradigm of self-regulatory feedback loops. Central to this examination will be the concepts of circularity and non-linearity as they affect family patterns and provide methods for determining clinical interventions. During the course, focus will be directed to the interactional model of therapy derived from how members of family systems coordinate action according to unstated family rules displayed through the family?s process. To illustrate, examples will be drawn from the Palo Alto research group headed by Gregory Bateson as they examined the communication patterns of families with a family member hospitalized for schizophrenia. This research group included such noteworthy therapists/scholars as Don Jackson, Jay Haley, Virginia Satir, Paul Watzlawick, John Weakland and Irving Yalom among others. Critical examination also will be made of different strategic models of therapy, including Jay Haley, Cloe Madanes, Olga Silverstein, and Peggy Papp. This will also include a brief description of the theoretic approach to change established by Milton Erickson. The course will also provide study of the Milan systemic approach. Led by Mara Selvini-Palazzoli and her colleagues Luigi Boscolo, Gianfranco Ceccin and Giuliana Prata, the Milan Associates developed a method of interviewing and case conceptualization that displayed the circular nature of the family system. They also created interventions designed to interrupt the family?s pattern in which the symptom was embedded. We will critique these ideas by examining contextual issues of ethnicity, power and gender as they relate to the systemic paradigm. Other critiques will examine systemic understanding of living systems predicated, not on homeostatic corrective action and enforcement of family rules, but as non-equilibrium- maintaining entities capable of sudden evolutionary leaps. This will include the ?second cybernetics? theoretic literature where systemic communication and clinical intervention are viewed as systemic efforts to seek higher orders of organizational complexity.
9/2013 - 12/2013 MFTH 624 Program Development for Families and Communities
The purpose of this course is to develop program design skills among class participants using the systemic/relational perspective of Marriage and Family Therapy. The first phase of the course will delineate structural representations for describing programs using Logic Model methodology coupled with the attributes of systemic/relational conceptualization. The second phase will apply these skills when examining examples of well-designed prevention, early intervention, and clinical treatment programs. In the third phase, class participants will be asked to develop a program of their choice using the standard format for proposals.
3/2010 - 6/2010 MFTH 524 Administration in Marriage and Family Therapy
This course is designed to prepare Marriage and Family Therapy doctoral students to manage human service programs and agencies. The systemic approach of MFT lends itself to all phases of not-for-profit human service management. Since most human service organizations exist to serve a community or population, the prevailing framework for the course will be mission-based management. Within this framework we will examine strategic planning as a method for creating organizational change and accountability to the stakeholders who support the organization. Two approaches will be examined regarding managing accountabilities: 1) the continuous quality improvement approach used in business that emphasizes process excellence through teams, and 2) the best-practice-standard approach used by accrediting organizations. Both have applicability in mission-based not-for-profit organizations. We will also clarify the leadership qualities required to successfully guide mission-based organizations. We will examine the different roles that chief executive officers are required to perform such as visionary, change-agent, relationship builder, community collaborator, and resource wizard. Fiscal issues will be examined as part of the systemic whole.
3/2008 - 6/2008 MFTH 625: Grant Writing
1/2008 - 3/2008 Advanced Program Development and Evaluation
The purpose of this course is to prepare students to refine, present and defend DMFT project proposals. Proposals will generally reflect one of the three major areas of focus for DMFT students: 1)Development of a systemic/relational prevention, early intervention, or clinical treatment program that includes an evaluation methodology; 2) Evaluation of a funded program, implemented in a public or private setting; or 3)Creation of a systemic/relational therapeutic protocol designed to address a clinical or service delivery issue.
1/2008 - 3/2008 MFTH 626 Program Evaluation and Monitoring
The purpose for this third course in the DMFT sequence is to prepare participants to conduct quantitative and qualitative formative and summative evaluation of programs. Special emphasis will be placed on evaluating programs and clinical outcomes using the systemic/relational perspective of Marriage and Family Therapy. The course will also develop participants? abilities to collaborate with stakeholders in developing evaluation plans that ensure evaluation reports meet the intended purposes and will be used for program decision-making. Types of evaluation research models include Assessing Program Need, Program Process and Performance Evaluation, Theory-Driven Evaluation, Impact Evaluation, and Goal-Free Evaluation.
1/2006 - 6/2005 MFTH 627 Advanced Program Development and Evaluation
The purpose of this course is to prepare students to develop, refine, implement, and evaluate projects. The projects generally reflect one of the three major areas of focus for DMFT students: 1)Development of a systemic/relational prevention, early intervention, or clinical treatment program that includes an evaluation methodology. 2)Evaluation of a funded program, implemented in a public or private setting. 3)Creation of a systemic/relational therapeutic protocol designed to address a clinical problem or service delivery issue. All advanced phases of specific project development will be addressed, including proposal and final project reports.
9/2004 - 12/2004 MFTH 506 Clinical 1: Cybernetics
This course explores the philosophical underpinnings of systemic thought and its clinical application to the field of Family Therapy. Special study will be given to the role of recursive epistemology as it relates to theory of Marriage and Family Therapy. We will examine the field?s initial application of General Systems Theory using the paradigm of self-regulatory feedback loops. Central to this examination will be the concepts of circularity and non-linearity as they affect family patterns and provide methods for determining clinical interventions. During the course, focus will be directed to the interactional model of therapy derived from how members of family systems coordinate action according to unstated family rules displayed through the family?s process. Critical examination also will be made of different strategic models of therapy, including Jay Haley, Cloe Madanes, Olga Silverstein, and Peggy Papp. The course will also provide study of the Milan systemic approach, led by the Milan Associates. We will critique these ideas by examining contextual issues of ethnicity, power and gender as they relate to the systemic paradigm. Other critiques will examine systemic understanding of living systems predicated, not on homeostatic corrective action and enforcement of family rules, but as non-equilibrium- maintaining entities capable of sudden evolutionary leaps. This will include the ?second cybernetics? theoretic literature where systemic communication and clinical intervention are viewed as systemic efforts to seek higher orders of organizational complexity.
9/2004 - 12/2004 MFTH 624 Program Development for Families and Communities
This course is the first of three consecutive quarters in the DMFT sequence in program design, grant writing, and evaluation. Our purpose in this first course is to develop program design skills among class participants using the systemic/relational perspective of Marriage and Family Therapy. The first phase of the course will delineate structural representations for describing programs using Logic Model methodology coupled with the attributes of systemic/relational conceptualization. The second phase will apply these skills when examining examples of well-designed prevention, early intervention, and clinical treatment programs. In the third phase, class participants will be asked to develop a program of their choice using the standard format for proposals.
6/2004 - 7/2004 MFTH 524 Administration in Marriage and Family Therapy
This course is designed to prepare Marriage and Family Therapy doctoral students to manage human service programs and agencies. The systemic approach of MFT lends itself to all phases of not-for-profit human service management. While this course will only briefly discuss the intricacies of agency budgeting, fiscal issues will also be treated as part of the systemic whole to be understood in context. The course will examine the issues of mission-based coordination and management including managing Boards; managing people; managing resources including fiscal oversight, marketing, technology, and fund development. The course will also delineate the methods of systemic strategic planning that assist organizations establish priorities regarding resource allocation. Two approaches will be examined regarding managing accountabilities within mission-based organizations: 1) the continuous quality improvement approach used in business, and 2) the best-practice-standard approach used by accrediting organizations. Both have applicability in mission-based not-for-profit organizations.
Interactive Teaching
 
1/2014 - 6/2014 MFTH 634 Doctoral Practicum
The purpose of this three-quarter practicum series on systems/relational therapy for doctoral students in marital and family therapy program is to integrate different modes of systemic/relational practice. The course requires each student to present videotapes of multiple cases currently seen in an approved practicum site or from the Loma Linda University Marriage and Family Therapy Clinic. The course also requires students to prepare a paper every two weeks. The paper should focus on an interactive portion of a clinical session of a felt client issue and how you worked and developed a therapeutic theme to facilitate change. Included in the paper should be 1) a description of the resonant issue along with the transcribed words of the individual, couple or family; 2) a statement of your therapeutic direction, intention, or intervention; 3) a description of the methods you used to keep the therapeutic theme alive; 4) a transcription of your verbal and nonverbal efforts to stay with your theme; 5) the results of your efforts both in the transcribed response of the client(s) and your own internal and assessment, and 6) three additional methods that could be used to maintain your thematic direction.
1/2014 - 6/2014 MFTH 634 Doctoral Practicum
The purpose of this three-quarter practicum series on systems/relational therapy for doctoral students in marital and family therapy program is to integrate different modes of systemic/relational practice. The course requires each student to present videotapes of multiple cases currently seen in an approved practicum site or from the Loma Linda University Marriage and Family Therapy Clinic. The course also requires students to prepare a paper every two weeks. The paper should focus on an interactive portion of a clinical session of a felt client issue and how you worked and developed a therapeutic theme to facilitate change. Included in the paper should be 1) a description of the resonant issue along with the transcribed words of the individual, couple or family; 2) a statement of your therapeutic direction, intention, or intervention; 3) a description of the methods you used to keep the therapeutic theme alive; 4) a transcription of your verbal and nonverbal efforts to stay with your theme; 5) the results of your efforts both in the transcribed response of the client(s) and your own internal and assessment, and 6) three additional methods that could be used to maintain your thematic direction.
9/2013 - 12/2013 MFTH 607 Scholarly Skills

This course orients Counseling and Family Sciences doctoral students with use of bibliographic search engines and databases to write critical literature reviews. The course will provide instruction on differential use of search terms unique to each specific bibliographic database such as PubMed, PsychInfo, EBSCOhost, Web of Science, and others.   The course will also provide an introduction to use of EndNote, a bibliographic software program that will allow you to begin developing your own bibliographic database for class projects, qualifying exams, research papers, DMFT projects, and dissertations.  Loma Linda University has purchased a site license for all students so you may download the software on your laptops.  Students will also learn how to organize a scholarly review paper using APA format and develop appropriate and effective style for professional writing.

Administrative Teaching Roles
 
8/2010 MFTH 626 Program Evaluation and Monitoring
The purpose for this course is to prepare participants to conduct formative and summative program evaluations using quantitative, qualitative, and mixed model designs. Special emphasis will be placed on evaluating programs and clinical outcomes using the systemic/relational perspective of Marriage and Family Therapy. The course will also develop participants'''' abilities to collaborate with stakeholders in developing evaluation plans that ensure evaluation reports meet the intended purposes and will be used for program decision-making. Types of evaluation research models include Assessing 1) Program Need, 2) Program Process and Performance (including client/participant outcomes and program outcomes), 3) Theory Applicability and Adherence, and 4) Impact Evaluation among others.
4/2010 - 6/2010 MFTH 525 Grant Writing
This course is the third of three consecutive quarters in the DMFT Program Development sequence dedicated to extending MFT principles to Program Design, Program Evaluation and Monitoring, and Grant Writing.  Because this course also can be taken by those in the Ph.D. program, this course is designed to prepare participants to seek and respond to two types of grant opportunities: 1) government and foundation program announcements seeking to fund services that will impact identified social and mental health problems or populations, and 2) research initiatives focused on reducing gaps in scientific knowledge, translating evidence-based knowledge into community settings, or training workers in evidence-based practice. Special emphasis will be placed on developing grant applications using the systemic/relational conceptual framework of Marriage and Family Therapy as a template for developing prevention, early intervention, or full-scale treatment programs. The MFT framework will also be used as the philosophical underpinning for developing research grants. Special focus will be devoted to using Internet web sites to access grantors? strategic plans, program announcements, or areas of interest. The course will also develop participants? abilities to critique and strengthen grant applications.
1/2010 - 6/2010 MFTH 627 Advanced Program Development and Evaluation
The purpose of this course is to prepare students to refine, present and defend DMFT project proposals. Proposals will generally reflect one of the four major areas of focus for DMFT students: 1)    Development of a systemic/relational prevention, early intervention, or clinical treatment program that includes an evaluation methodology. 2)   Evaluation of an existing program, implemented in a public or private setting. 3)   Creation and evaluation of a systemic/relational therapeutic protocol or training program designed to address a clinical or service delivery issue. 4)     Assessment of need for a program that results in a systemic/relational intervention that is ready for implementation. 
1/2010 - 3/2010 MFTH 634 Doctoral Practicum
The purpose of this three-quarter practicum series on systems/relational therapy for doctoral students in marital and family therapy program is to integrate different modes of systemic/relational practice. The course requires each student to present videotapes of multiple cases currently seen in an approved practicum site or from the Loma Linda University Marriage and Family Therapy Clinic. The course also requires students to prepare a paper every two weeks. The paper should focus on an interactive portion of a clinical session of a felt client issue and how you worked and developed a therapeutic theme to facilitate change. Included in the paper should be 1) a description of the resonant issue along with the transcribed words of the individual, couple or family; 2) a statement of your therapeutic direction, intention, or intervention; 3) a description of the methods you used to keep the therapeutic theme alive; 4) a transcription of your verbal and nonverbal efforts to stay with your theme; 5) the results of your efforts both in the transcribed response of the client(s) and your own internal and assessment, and 6) three additional methods that could be used to maintain your thematic direction.
9/2009 - 12/2009 MFTH 506 Cybernetics
This course explores the philosophical underpinnings of systemic thought and its clinical application to the field of Family Therapy. Special study will be given to the role of recursive epistemology as it relates to theory of Marriage and Family Therapy. We will examine the field?s initial application of General Systems Theory using the paradigm of self-regulatory feedback loops. Central to this examination will be the concepts of circularity and non-linearity as they affect family patterns and provide methods for determining clinical interventions. During the course, focus will be directed to the interactional model of therapy derived from how members of family systems coordinate action according to unstated family rules displayed through the family?s process. To illustrate, examples will be drawn from the Palo Alto research group headed by Gregory Bateson as they examined the communication patterns of families with a family member hospitalized for schizophrenia. This research group included such noteworthy therapists/scholars as Don Jackson, Jay Haley, Virginia Satir, Paul Watzlawick, John Weakland and Irving Yalom among others. Critical examination also will be made of different strategic models of therapy, including Jay Haley, Cloe Madanes, Olga Silverstein, and Peggy Papp. This will also include a brief description of the theoretic approach to change established by Milton Erickson. The course will also provide study of the Milan systemic approach. Led by Mara Selvini-Palazzoli and her colleagues Luigi Boscolo, Gianfranco Ceccin and Giuliana Prata, the Milan Associates developed a method of interviewing and case conceptualization that displayed the circular nature of the family system. They also created interventions designed to interrupt the family?s pattern in which the symptom was embedded. We will critique these ideas by examining contextual issues of ethnicity, power and gender as they relate to the systemic paradigm. Other critiques will examine systemic understanding of living systems predicated, not on homeostatic corrective action and enforcement of family rules, but as non-equilibrium- maintaining entities capable of sudden evolutionary leaps. This will include the ?second cybernetics? theoretic literature where systemic communication and clinical intervention are viewed as systemic efforts to seek higher orders of organizational complexity.
9/2009 MFTH 607 Computer
This course is designed to acquaint doctoral students with software that will be of benefit for both qualitative and quantitative research, program development/grant writing, and to provide an overview of program management software often used to monitor funded activity in human services.
7/2007 - 6/2008 Program Coordinator, DMFT Program
Direct and coordinate the Doctor of Marital and Family Therapy (DMFT) program to ensure adherence to accreditation standards, conguence with the mission and standards of the university, and maintenance of enrollment and program viability.
7/2004 - 6/2008 Chair, Dissertation Committees
Provide direction and guidance to students writing dissertations.
7/2004 - 6/2008 Chair, DMFT Project Committees
Provide direction and guidance to students writing final DMFT projects.
7/2004 - 6/2005 Coordinator of DMFT
Develop, coordinate, and maintain all functions and activities associated with the Doctor of Marital and Family Therapy degree.
7/2004 - 6/2005 Director, Loma Linda University Marriage and Family Therapy Clinic
Provide administrative oversight to the clinic including policies and procedures, clinical and administrative responsibility allocation, and new services and contracts.
1/2000 - 6/2006 Director, LLU Marriage and Family Therapy Clinic
Direct all clinical and administrative activities at the clinic, including adherence to standards of care, development of clinical staff, and development of additional sources of funding.
Instructional Prep of New Material
 
9/2007 - 12/2007 MFTH 624: Program Development for Families and Communities
Developed Blackboard peer learning component throughout the class.
6/2007 - 7/2007 Advanced MFT Assessment