Loma Linda University

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Faculty Directory
  
Willie Davis, PhD
Chair, Pharmaceutical and Administrative Sciences
School of Pharmacy
Associate Professor, Pharmaceutical and Administrative Sciences
School of Pharmacy
Associate Professor, Basic Sciences
School of Medicine
Member, Pharmaceutical Science, SP, Faculty of Graduate Studies
Other LLU Classes Outside Of Schedule 
Lecture
 
1/2008 - 4/2008 Physiology II - RXPS 525
Winter Quarter 2008 3 credit hours - 6 1-hour lectures During this course the gastrointestinal, respiratory, and cardiovascular systems were the general topic areas that were discussed. The lectures were primarily focused on the molecular determinants of homeostasis and the major molecular targets relevant to pharmacological intervention in related disease states. The discussion of the gastrointestinal system provided an appropriate avenue for a continuation of the discussion of drug metabolism and elimination. For the past three years I have been the course coordinator and a major content provider of this couse. As such, I have been responsible for the conceptualization and implementation of revisions that have occurred during the continued development of this course.
9/2007 - Present

Biochemistry I - RXPS 581


Fall Quarter 2007 3 credit hours - 30 1-hour lectures During this course, protein chemistry, enzymology, and carbohydrate metabolism were the general topic areas that were presented and discussed. The lectures were primarily focused on the molecular determinants of homeostasis, major molecular targets relevant to pharmacotherapy, and biotransformation of drugs and endogenous biological molecules. Because of the content, this course served as an introduction to pharmacology for the first year students. For the past three years I have been the course coordinator and major content provider of this couse. As such, I have been responsible for the conceptualization and implementation of revisions that have occurred during the continued development of this course.

9/2007 - 12/2007

Physiology I - RXPS 524


Fall Quarter 2007 3 credit hours - 15 1-hour lectures During this course, the nervous, endocrine, musculoskeletal, and urinary systems were the general topic areas that were discussed. The lectures were primarily focused on the molecular determinants of homeostasis and the major molecular targets relevant to pharmacological intervention in related disease states. The discussion of the urinary system provided an appropriate avenue for introductory discussion of drug metabolism and elimination. For the past three years I have been the course coordinator and major content provider of this couse. As such, I have been responsible for the conceptualization and implementation of revisions that have occurred during the continued development of this course.

4/2006 - 6/2007

Anatomy & Physiology III - RXPS 523


Spring Quarter 2006 3 credit hours - 23 1-hour lectures and 5 1-hour PBL sessions During this course the pathophysiological process involved in the development of diabetes, atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's Disease, HIV/AIDS, and lung cancer were presented and discussed. As many of the relevant topics in these pathological processes were discussed in previous course, this course served to review and extend these prior discussions. Therefore this course serves as a capstone course for the Anatomy & Physiology and Biochemistry course sequences. Content delivery in this course was accomplished through 20 1-hour lectures and 5 1-hour problem-based learning (PBL) sessions. The PBL sessions were organized as discussions of the current clincal guidelines that are related to the pathological processes that were discussed. The guidelines that were presented in the course included the ADA 2006, JNC7, and ATPIII guidelines. These guidelines were discussed from a biochemical and physiological perspective. During these sessions I served as the moderator and facilitator of the discussion. The nature of these discussions provided opportunities for collaborative learning that supported the content areas within the course. An additional collaborative learning opportuniy was provided through a group paper and presentation. The group paper was required to include coverage of relevant information in both pathophysiology and pharmacogenomics. Therefore this activity allowed for the integration of knowledge between the two courses. For the past two years I have been the course coordinator and major content provider of this couse. As such, I have been responsible for the conceptualization and implementation of revisions that have occurred during the continued development of this course.

4/2006 - 6/2007

Molecular Biology/Pharmacogenomics - RXPS 530


Spring Quarter 2006 3 credit hours - 19 1-hour lectures and 5 1-hour PBL sessions During this quarter, students were introduced to this evolving relationship within the current biopsychosocial model of pharmacy practice. This course also provided a context in which students could explore developments in the pursuit of individualized drug therapies. The lectures fell into three general categories: 1) social and economic issues related to pharmacogenomics; 2) the pharmacogenetics of therapeutic response; 3) the relationship between genomics and disease. Specific topics that were discussed included CYP polymorphisms, polymorphisms in drug transporters, the role of genetic variability in pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease. Because of the nature of several of these topics and topics discussed in earlier courses, students were given an opportunity to solidify their understanding of first pass metabolism. Content delivery in this course was accomplished through 19 1-hour lectures and 5 1-hour problem-based learning (PBL) sessions. The PBL sessions were organized as discussions of the current basic science articles that were related to the phamacogenomics topics that were discussed. During these sssions I served as the moderator and facilitator of the discussion. The nature of these discussions provided opportunities for collaborative learning that supported the content areas within the course. An additional collaborative learning opportuniy was provided through a group paper and presentation. The group paper was required to include coverage of relevant information in both pathophysiology and pharmacogenomics. Therefore this activity allowed for the integration of knowledge between the two courses. This is my first year to be involved in the teaching of this course. As such, from my prespective, this activity represents the creation of a new course. I have been responsible for the conceptualization and implementation of this course.

4/2006 - 6/2007

Novel Anticancer Drug Targets - RXPS 720


In this course, students follow the development of a new anticancer drug from basic science research through clincal trials. This is accomplished through in-class discussion of the current scientific literature. Students also review the ethical guidelines and rules that govern human subject research in the US, as well as the drug approval process. During both Spring quarter 2006 and Spring quarter 2007 I coordinated this course and provided 10 lecture hours of content.

11/2005

Advanced Ethics - RELE 706


Fall 2005 I gave one 1-hour lecture in the Advanced Ethics course which is taken by third-year pharmacy students and coordinated by Dr. Mark Carr. In this lecture we discussed current developments regarding conflict of interest issues relating to financial and business relationships between the pharmaceutical industry and NIH scientists. I presented elements of the case study and facilitated the discussion regarding the relevant ethical issues that were involved.

1/2005 - Present

Biochemistry II - RXPS 582


Winter Quarter 2006 3 credit hours - 30 1-hour lectures During this course the discussion of metabolism was continued and extended through a presentation of oxidative phosphorylation, lipid catabolism and synthesis, amino acid biosynthesis and catabolism, and nucleotide biosynthesis and catabolism. To prepare students for the molecular biology course in the Spring quarter, fundamental topics in the transfer of genetic information was also discussed. The lectures were primarily focused on the molecular determinants of homeostasis and the major molecular targets relevant to pharmacological intervention in related disease states. The discussion of the DNA replication provided an appropriate opportunity for an introductory discussion of cancer biology and chemotherapy. The discussion of intermediary metabolism allowed a detailed discussion and reinforcement of topics relative to diabetes mellitus. For the past three years I have been the course coordinator and major content provider of this couse. As such, I have been responsible for the conceptualization and implementation of revisions that have occurred during the continued development of this course.

9/2004 - 12/2007

Anatomy & Physiology I - RXPS 521


Autumn Quarter 2005 3 credit hours - 30 1-hour lectures During this course, the nervous, endocrine, musculoskeletal, and urinary systems the following general topic areas were discussed. The lectures were primarily focused on the molecular determinants of homeostasis and the major molecular targets relevant to pharmacological intervention in related disease states. The discussion of the urinary system provided an appropriate avenue for introductory discussion of drug metabolism and elimination. Content devivery in this course was accomplished through 23 1-hour lectures and 5 2-hour problem-based learning (PBL) sessions. These PBL sessions were held in tandem with Biochemistry I and were organized as collaborative group learning projects that dealt with content areas within the course. For the past two years I have been the course coordinator and major content provider of this couse. As such, I have been responsible for the conceptualization and implementation of revisions that have occurred during the continued development of this course.

Interactive Teaching
 
12/2007

NIH Ethics: What is the Potential Impact on Biopsychosocial Research in the US?   Loma Linda University, Department of Psychiatry Grand Rounds

4/2007 - 6/2007

PY3 Research Elective


During Spring quarter 2007, I preceptored two third-year pharmacy students in a research rotation. This activity accounted for approximately 40 hours of effort.

4/2007 - 6/2007

PY3 Research Elective

* test
Administrative Teaching Roles
 
1/2011 - 4/2011

  RXPS 784 – Special Topics: Biochemical and Social Aspects of the Obesity Epidemic in the United States 

1/2008 - 4/2008

Course Coordinator - Physiology II - RXPS 525


Winter Quarter - 2008 I conceptualized and organized the course content within this course sequence.

9/2007 - 12/2007

Course Coordinator - Physiology I - RXPS 524


Fall Quarter - 2007 I conceptualized and organized the course content within this course sequence.

4/2006 - 6/2007

Course Coordinator - Molecular Biology/Pharmacogenomics - RXPS 530


Spring Quarter - 2007 I conceptualized and organized the course content within this course sequence.

1/2005 - Present

Course Coordinator - Biochemistry II - RXPS 582


Winter Quarter - 2007 I conceptualized and organized the course content within this course sequence.

9/2004 - Present

Couse Coordinator - Biochemistry I - RXPS 581


I conceptualized and organized the course content within this course sequence.

7/2004 - Present

Course coordinator - Biochemistry ! (RXPS 581) and Biochemistry II (RXPS 582)

Instructional Prep of New Material
 
7/2011 - Present

Change of Biochemistry Course Delivery to Team-Based Learning (TBL) Format

 


In the 2011 - 2012 academic year, I updated the two-quarter Biochemistry course sequence so that content delivery would utilize TBL. The goal of this change was to improve student learning through peer-to-peer teaching. This change required revision of all lecture materials (with input from high-performing students), constructing cases to be used for team projects and writing a series of individual and team quizes for formative assessment. The year one experience was promising and small revisions have been made as we enter year 2.

9/2004 - 6/2005

Revision of School of Pharmacy Anatomy & Physiology Sequence


I revised the anatomy and physiology sequence in the school of pharmacy so that there is now coordination of topics across the A&P and Biochemistry sequences. This revision has included syllabus development, textbook selection, and the development of a longitudinal case study which reinforces the material covered in lecture. Since these course are offered during to our first-year students it is a foundational course for subsequent therapeutics and pharmacology courses.

9/2004 - 6/2005

Revision of School of Pharmacy Biochemistry Sequence


I revised the biochemistry sequence in the school of pharmacy so that there is now coordination of topics across the A&P and Biochemistry sequences. This revision has included syllabus development, textbook selection, and the development of a longitudinal case study which reinforces the material covered in lecture. Since these course are offered during to our first-year students it is a foundational course for subsequent therapeutics and pharmacology courses.